Authors & Speakers Network Blog with Larry James

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

You Say You’re An Author, Not A Marketer? Think Again

Filed under: Author Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am
Tags: , ,

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Sometimes I speak to authors who finally have a book ready for publication after months or years of hard work, yet sadly, in all that time, they neglected to give any thought to a key reality of the book-publishing world.

The responsibility for marketing the book falls on their shoulders and they should have had a promotional plan in place ready to go when the book was launched.

A&SmarketingWhen I point that out, they respond by saying, “But, I’m an author, not a marketer!”

If you are thinking the same thing, it’s time for a quick adjustment in your mindset. Because you have to be both!

If you want your book to have a chance at succeeding, this is on you.

Happily, today there are more ways than ever to market your book (or business, for that matter) and social media marketing should be one of the key components in your promotional plan. Social media provides a number of effective tools that allow you to connect with people who share your passion for the topic you wrote about.

Some of you may be saying, “But I have no interest in social media. I hate the idea of posting on Twitter or sharing my thoughts and pictures on Facebook.”

I get what you’re saying! Like it or not, though, your personal feelings are beside the point. Whether you are a fan of social media doesn’t matter. Whether you believe too much time is wasted on sending out tweets or liking things on Facebook also is irrelevant.

The reality is what it is. You need to recognize its importance or risk falling by the wayside.

I encountered yet another reminder of how crucial it is to establish yourself in the social media world just a few days ago when I had a conversation with an agent friend of mine. She had put together a TV treatment for a client with several novels she thought could be adapted to a series for the small screen.

The feedback she got was predictable – the author needed to have a significant following on social media before the studios would even look at the treatment.

So what’s considered significant? Good question. A number we’ve heard from agents and publishers alike is a minimum of 10,000 followers.

But it’s not only about the numbers. They are meaningful, but just as important for building your online brand is having a large following that you are engaged with. You post a tweet and some of your followers respond with a question. You answer the question and get more comments or questions.

The more active you engage your followers, the better.

Here are a few other marketing tips to remember:

Don’t buy fake followers. Yes, you really can buy fake followers on social media, but why would you? These are not people you can interact with or who have the potential to become future readers or customers. Buying fake followers pads your numbers, but it’s a pointless charade and eventually you will be found out. When that happens, your reputation will take a hit.

Take advantage of groups and lists. One great thing about social media sites is they give you the ability to connect with like-minded people, many of whom may be future customers. LinkedIn, for example, has groups you can join. On Twitter, it is lists. Either way, these features help you connect with people most likely to have an interest in what you have to offer. It’s also good to connect with the well-known people in your field, because if you can get those people to follow you, some of their following may follow you too. This is a legitimate way to ratchet up your numbers.

Don’t abandon traditional media. As wonderful as social media sites are, you don’t want to ignore radio, TV and editorial coverage in print publications and online. These venues are extremely important in helping you build your brand and boost your numbers.
Setting words down on paper – or more likely a computer screen – and ending up with a book is a wonderful accomplishment.

But to avoid staring at a stack of unsold books, you will need to doff your writer’s hat and don your marketing cap. If you don’t feel qualified or have the time to tackle that on your own, you need to find someone to help. Here’s to dual roles.

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

letsbefriends2

Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s Pinterest page for authors and speakers at: https://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/authors-speakers-blog/

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Friday, March 27, 2015

How to Get Publicity from Talk Radio

Filed under: Radio Talk Show Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am
Tags: ,

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

I’ve gotten back into hosting a talk radio show and giving interviews, and the experience takes me back – way back! – to how I started EMSI Public Relations in the first place.

I was, and still am, a huge talk radio listener. It’s educational, entertaining, and the most open of the mainstream media to any and all topics. Pair a great show host with an informative guest (tips on that coming up) and I’m rapt. That’s why, when I started EMSI 23 years ago, I focused on booking clients on talk radio shows.

A&SRadioPublicityOver the years, of course, we added TV, print and social media. The four media each have a different audience and attributes that sometimes make one better for a particular message than another. But, between you and me, talk radio is still my favorite.

Since I returned to doing interviews myself as a marketing tool for EMSI, I’m reminded just how much I enjoy this medium. Doing an interview over the phone from my living room or my office is easy, the conversations are fun, and I not only help people by sharing what I know, I get the word out about my business!

If you haven’t considered talk radio for marketing, you might want to. Here’s what those interviews can do for you:

1. Position you as an expert in your field.
2. Gain you (and your product/company/book) the implied endorsement of mainstream media.
3. Put your name and the name of whatever you’re selling in front of a large audience.

The best way to ensure you have a successful interview is to forget you’ve got something to sell and work your marketing efforts around the goal of being the perfect radio guest. How?

Engage the host. The host is your most important audience. People are usually fans of particular shows because they’re interested in what he or she has to say, so if you can engage the host, you will engage the audience. Talk candidly and openly about your topic in relationship to the current events surrounding it. Make sure your advice is honest as well as conversational, and try to be as natural as possible. Listeners will be able to sense whether your interview is genuine. But don’t worry about entertaining them; entertain the host.

Don’t sell. Stay on topic during the interview, and when appropriate, mention the free material on your website that could benefit listeners. If you engage the host, give a great interview and offer helpful information, you don’t have to worry about selling anything. The host will do it for you. He’ll make sure his audience knows you’re an expert, he’ll share your website’s address, he’ll mention the name of your book or he’ll talk about the value of your product. He’ll do the promotion for you.

Have a website that does more than sell your product. If you’re an author, feature a blog on your site and write fresh posts regularly with tips and insights related to your topic so that your visitors keep coming back. If you’re selling a product, create free reports or articles for your site that lay out the problem your product solves, again, in an educational tone.

Your great interview will get radio listeners interested in you. The host will appreciate your efforts and reward you by urging his loyal audience to visit your site. If you’re really good, he may even ask you back again.
Don’t forget to share your interview on social media, and to post it on your website, where it can continue to work for you by boosting your credibility to visitors.

That’s what I call the magic of radio. It’s an incredibly cost-effective and versatile marketing tool, whether you’re an author, a professional or a manufacturer of consumer products. There’s simply no better way to have a live conversation with a dedicated audience tuned in to hear what you have to say.

Don’t touch that dial!

BONUS Articles: How to Be a Great Radio Guest! ~ Part One
How to Be a Great Radio Guest! ~ Part Two
How to be the Perfect Talk Radio Guest

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

letsbefriends2

Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s Pinterest page for authors and speakers at: https://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/authors-speakers-blog/

Saturday, February 7, 2015

Using Social Media to Boost Book Signings

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Whether your book is a nonfiction marketing tool for your brand or business, or the newest release in your writing career, staging book signings can help build your audience.

It’s an age-old practice that has changed – as with almost everything in the publishing industry – due to social media and other online tools. Not only do platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+ make it easier to promote your signing, they also provide new opportunities for maximizing the return on your investment.

A&SNetbooksigningsBook signings, which can include an informative or interesting presentation or demonstration, have always held more value than meets the eye. Here are three benefits that may not have occurred to you:

• They get your book into shops that might not otherwise carry it. Bookstores are choosy; their numbers are declining (there were reportedly 10,200 nationwide in 2011) and they have many books from which to choose – more than 730,000 new titles a year, including traditionally and self-published print and e-books.

• The store may create a special display featuring your book – especially if you ask! If that happens, you just got valuable free merchandising.

• The store will likely promote your book signing, including sending announcements of the event to its customers and local publications. Anything the store does in that regard is also great marketing for you!

While it’s nice if the store promotes your book signing, you owe it to the shop and yourself to do all you can as well. The more people who come to the event, the more books you sell and the more likely the store will invite you back again. This is where social media can help.

Here are some tips for spreading the word online:

• Get into local social media groups and “communities” that are built around shared interests relevant to your book. For instance, if you were doing a book signing in the Tampa area for a marketing book, you could join LinkedIn’s Tampa Bay Marketing Professionals group. (Do not simply start announcing your event though!) Instead …

• Share a short article with useful information that links back to your website, where the event announcement is prominently displayed with details about your valuable presentation.

• Join in a conversation on any of the platforms, or start a new one, and casually mention along the way that you’ll be in that city speaking and signing books.

• For groups on any of the large social platforms, let the group’s manager or administrator know you have an event coming up that will be of interest to his/her members and ask if he’ll share that information or allow you to.

• Buy ads – for very little money! – on LinkedIn or Facebook announcing your event.

• On LinkedIn, click the “Promotions” tab near the top of the group’s page and you’ll be taken to another page where promoting to that group is welcomed.

• During your event, be sure to have someone take photos that you can share on your social media networks. Photos of you engaging with readers or enthusiastically giving a presentation not only give you more visibility, they make your event look like fun!

One last word of advice: Don’t get discouraged if throngs of fans don’t turn out – believe me, it happens to even well-known authors! Instead, remember all that you’ve accomplished simply by arranging the event.

If traffic is slow, you can make good use of your time by introducing yourself to some of the shop staff and engaging them in conversation. They just might remember the friendly author they chatted with the next time they’re asked for a book recommendation.

BONUS Articles: 40+ Ways to Make Your Next Book Signing an EVENT!!
How to Book a Book Signing And Other Important Stuff!
Book Signing Strategies
Getting Into Bookstores? – 7 Tips to Help You!

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

letsbefriends2

Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Friday, January 30, 2015

Tips for Making the Most of Your Print Interview

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Getting media exposure means putting yourself out there. It might be chatting live on the air with a radio talk show host, taping an appearance for TV, or being interviewed by a print journalist.

Some people enjoy print because they have more time to ponder their answers. But it makes others (me included!) nervous. I worry about how the reporter will interpret my responses, and how they’ll be sliced, diced and repackaged for an article.

PrintInterviewThere are things you can do, though, to ensure your print interview goes well; that the reporter understands you, and you get your message across. Here are 5 tips:

Do NOT try to pitch, sell or promote your book, product or business:

Yes, it may be the reason you’re granting interviews, but if you want to sell something, you should buy an ad. The journalists are looking for you, as someone with a particular expertise, to provide content for their readers. That may be adding another voice to a story with multiple viewpoints. Or it may even be sharing your story – how you reinvented yourself after being laid off, or how you managed to write a novel while raising 13 kids. Either way, the goal of the journalist is to write an article that’s useful, informative and/or entertaining. Your goal is to get media exposure: your name and the source of your expertise in front of thousands, perhaps millions, of eyes.

Try to speak clearly and at a moderate pace:

Whether the reporter is taking notes with a pen or a computer, it will be difficult for him or her to keep up if you get excited and start talking very quickly. Not only might he miss some of the brilliant things you have to say, he may (gulp!) make an error that becomes a misquote in the story. Speak at a conversational speed, and if you really want to be a big help, offer to spell any less-than-obvious names you toss out. A good reporter will double-check the spelling, but you’ll save her time by giving her a starting point.

You don’t have to answer immediately, and you don’t have to answer every question:

Most of us would be hard put to respond off the top of our heads to, “What was the most pivotal moment of your life?” If you can’t, don’t. Ask the reporter to give you some time to think about it. By the same token, if you don’t feel qualified to answer a question, it’s far better to be honest about that than to take a stab at a response that makes you sound, um, unqualified. Remember, you’re in control. No one will think less of you if you politely decline a question for which you have no answer!

Take your own notes before the interview:

You likely have a good idea of what the reporter is writing about – and if you don’t it’s perfectly acceptable to ask what the gist of the story is. That gives you time to prepare relevant comments. If they’re looking for tips, list a few on paper in case you draw a blank. That will also help you plan ahead so you can speak concisely and get to the point quickly. Personal anecdotes always add color and interest to a story. Think about whether you’ve got a good short one (short is appreciated!) that will illustrate your point.

Be prepared to email a high-resolution photo of yourself:

Print publications cannot use the low-resolution photos that look so sharp online; the files are too small to reproduce at any decent size on paper. Most require an image that’s 300 dpi (dots per inch). Keep one of yourself at the ready to send via email, if the reporter asks, as soon as the interview is over. Not having it – or not knowing what a high-resolution photo is – could mean a missed opportunity to get your name, book title and face in front of a big audience.

Sound easy? You’re right, it is. So relax and enjoy your interview.

Before you know it, a Google search of your name will produce dozens of publications quoting you and mentioning your product, business or book. That may lead to even more requests, all of which build your profile and your audience.

Stop the presses!

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

letsbefriends2

Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Thursday, January 22, 2015

How to be the Perfect Talk Radio Guest

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

I was, and still am, a huge talk radio listener. It’s educational, entertaining, and open to any and all topics – more so than any of the other traditional media. Pair a great show host with an informative guest (tips on that coming up) and I’m rapt. That’s why, when I started EMSI 25 years ago, I focused on booking clients on talk radio shows.

Over the years, we added TV, print and social media. The four media each have a different audience and characteristics that sometimes make one better for a particular message than another. But, between you and me, talk radio is still my favorite.

A&STalkRadioSince I’m often a guest on radio shows myself – I practice what I preach when it comes to publicity for my company! – I’m reminded just how much I enjoy this medium. Doing an interview over the phone from my living room or my office is easy, the conversations are fun, and I not only help people by sharing what I know, I get the word out about my business!

If you haven’t considered talk radio for marketing, you might want to. Here’s what those interviews can do for you:

• Position you as an expert in your field.
• Gain you (and your product/company/book) the implied endorsement of mainstream media.
• Put your name and the name of whatever you’re selling in front of a large audience.

The best way to ensure you have a successful interview is to forget you’ve got something to sell and work your marketing efforts around the goal of being the perfect radio guest. How?

Engage the host. He or she is your most important audience. People are usually fans of particular shows because they’re interested in what the hosts have to say — if you can engage them, you will engage the audience. Talk candidly and openly about your topic in relationship to the current events surrounding it. Be upbeat, honest, conversational, and as natural as possible. Listeners will be able to sense whether your interview is genuine. But don’t worry about entertaining them; entertain the host.

Don’t sell. Stay on topic during the interview, and when appropriate, mention the free material on your website that could benefit listeners. If you engage the host, give a great interview and offer helpful information, you don’t have to worry about selling anything. The host will do it for you. He’ll make sure his audience knows you’re an expert, he’ll share your website’s address, he’ll mention the name of your book or he’ll talk about the value of your product. He’ll do the promotion for you.

Have a website that does more than sell your product. Feature a blog on your site with content that’s regularly refreshed. Offer tips and insights related to your topic so that your visitors keep coming back. Create free reports or articles for your site that lay out the problem your product solves, again, in an informative tone.

Your great interview will get radio listeners interested in you. The host will appreciate your efforts and reward you by urging his loyal audience to visit your site. If you’re really good, he may even ask you back again.

Don’t forget to share your interview on social media, and to post it on your website, where it can continue to work for you by boosting your credibility to visitors.

That’s what I call the magic of radio. It’s an incredibly cost-effective and versatile marketing tool, whether you’re an author, a professional or a manufacturer of consumer products. There’s simply no better way to have a live conversation with a dedicated audience tuned in to hear what you have to say.

BONUS Articles: Why Talk Radio May Be Your Best Bet for Publicity
How to Be a Great Radio Guest! ~ Part One
Preparing for Your First Interview as a Published Author

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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A&SNetLOGO150

Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

letsbefriends2

Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Friday, August 15, 2014

Why Talk Radio May Be Your Best Bet for Publicity

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

What’s the most effective traditional medium for getting publicity to promote your business or service?

That depends on your audience and your message.

You may find more of your target demographics among magazine readers than TV audiences, or among talk radio listeners than newspaper readers. Most likely, though, you’ll find at least some segment using each of the traditional news media – the newspapers and other publications, TV talk shows and talk radio.

TalkRadioA trickier problem is identifying where your message will get the best reception. Print editors and news talk show hosts and producers are looking for content – articles and guest interviews – that will interest their audiences. Local and national daytime TV talk shows tend to like lighter subject matter and topics that women find helpful. Print publications, both the paper kind and those publishing online, gravitate toward articles linked to the news of the day.

AM/FM and satellite talk radio has a place for all of the above – and lots more, which is one reason I’ve been an avid listener forever. I’ve also been a syndicated show host, and I’ve been getting clients talk radio publicity for 24 years. I am, emphatically, a diehard talk radio fan.

Now that radio has fully embraced digital media, it has become even more valuable as a publicity tool. I asked fellow radio lover Alex Hinojosa, our vice president of media operations and a major-market radio personality for 17 years, to share some of talk radio’s distinct advantages. Because he’s spent so much time on the other side, I wanted you to hear his perspective:

• Guests get unedited access, meaning their conversation is not edited down to a 30-second sound bite (like TV) or a quote or two in an article (print).

• Dedicated listeners are big fans of their favorite show hosts, which means they take the hosts’ implied endorsement of guests seriously. Simply said: If their favorite talk show host finds you credible, they will, too.

• An mp3 file of your interview posted on your website will continue to bolster your credibility for months or years to come.
Your mp3 can be posted as a video to YouTube for more visibility. Give it the right name, and it will help boost your website’s ranking in Google searches.

• Transcribe the interview and then break it up into a few blog posts and you’ve got fresh content for your website

• Give a great interview and the station may turn it into a podcast, which makes it easy to share on social media.

He also pulled out some recent research that shows AM/FM talk radio remains a popular staple for a large and loyal number of Americans:

• We spend more than 2 hours a day listening (Edison Research)

• News-talk remained king of the airwaves in 2013 (Nielsen)

• More than one-third of 18- to 64-year-olds are “radio junkies” (researcher Mark Kassof) who “pay a lot of attention” when they listen. Another group, “info-maniacs,” listens for “practical information that makes your life better” and “To learn things that make you more informed.” They tend to act based on what they hear on the radio.

I built my business on talk radio because I believed in it. And I still do. Not only is it still thriving, it’s more accessible than the other traditional media for people seeking publicity. No matter what a person’s area of expertise, from health food supplements to paranormal phenomena, there are show hosts who want that person.

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2014 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
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Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
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Friday, October 11, 2013

8 Tips for Being a Great TV Talk Show Guest

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Article Highlights:

1. Relax and treat the host like a friend.
2. Dress in solid, darker colors.
3. Be an expert guest, not a salesperson

Making your first television appearance as a guest on a news or talk show can be one of the most thrilling, and nerve-wracking, events in your publicity campaign.

Barbara Walters

Larry James with Barbara Walters on “The View”

Let’s face it – we think TV, we think celebrity. It’s exciting. Ever spot the anchor from your local TV newscast dining in the same restaurant as you? Did you grab your companion’s arm, point, and say, sotto voce, “Look!”? (Yes, I’m guilty, too.)

As much as TV can be a shot at junior stardom, it’s an equal opportunity to fall flat on your face – at least, that’s the fear many people have. That’s why I’d like to introduce you to Russ Handler, our TV Campaign Manager at EMSI. Russ has some tips to offer from his years of experience as an on-air traffic anchor and producer for a major-market news station:

1. Take some time well before the show to prepare what you’ll be talking about. You’ve only got about 3 to 5 minutes, so you want to make the most out of that on-air time.

2. The way you look is critical, because your appearance affects how the audience perceives you.

3. Avoid wearing white clothes, which tend to wash out on camera, and tight-patterned fabrics, which can make the picture flutter. Solid and darker colors are usually best, but simple patterns like stripes or polka-dots are okay if the pattern’s not too tight.

4. Avoid shorter skirts, shorts or turtlenecks and loose jewelry around the neck or wrist. The microphones are sensitive and may pick up clacking beads and bracelets. Remember that your footwear may be visible, so make sure your shoes are in good condition and reflect your professionalism.

tv3

Larry James with Tara Hitchcock,
TV 3, Phoenix”

5. Ignore the cameras. Instead, have a friendly conversation with the hosts as if you’re sitting with them in your home. The more relaxed you are, the more competent you will appear and the more the audience will warm to you.

6. During the interview, if the host motions for you to look at a monitor, it’s because the video or graphics being displayed is what the audience is seeing on their screen. You should comment on what the viewers are seeing and, if appropriate, use this opportunity to convey your message.

7. Make sure to bring a copy of your book or a sample of your product to the station. Before the segment, talk to the producer and ask whether you can display it during the interview. It’s always a good idea to bring extra product samples or books as gifts for the host and producers. If you’re an author, an autographed copy of your book is also a nice touch.

8. Keep in mind that it is NOT the hosts’ responsibility to mention the title of your book or product or where viewers can buy it, so make sure to mention that at least once – but DON’T turn the segment into an infomercial. If you have a book that’s sold on Amazon.com as well as a personal website, mention Amazon; viewers are familiar with it and will be more likely to remember it.

Before you walk into the studio, remind yourself to be informative, animated and expressive. This is your moment to shine, so go for it.

I hope Russ’s tips help make you a star on your first – or next – TV appearance. Don’t be surprised if the next time you go out to eat, you see diners pointing at you and saying, “Look!”

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2013 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

How Talking to the Media is Like Giving a Speech And… How It’s Not!

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

I recently traveled to Toronto to speak at a conference for business and professional women. It was an exciting event with women from varied backgrounds speaking on a range of topics designed to inspire and empower the attendees.

In preparing my talking points, I thought long and hard about which elements of my knowledge and experience would most benefit this audience. What did I want them to take away from their 45 minutes with me?

mediaIn that regard, preparing for a speech is in many ways like preparing for a radio, TV or print interview, or developing content for social media. You need to know your audience, and you need to think about what they’ll take away from listening to (or reading) what you have to say. Those take-aways should be information that holds a lot of value – not for you, but for them.

There are also a number of differences between a speech delivered directly to your audience, and talking to your audience via the media. Some, of course, are obvious. But others may not have occurred to you.

Here are a few:

For TV and radio:

Less time equals fewer “bullet points”: Occasionally, you’ll get a 30-minute or even an hour-long interview, but more often, you’ll have just a few minutes to make your points. So keep it simple! What two to three take-aways will reflect your message and benefit your listeners?

I talk to many people who have a difficult time distilling their “story” into seconds-long sound bites. If you’re like them, banish the “story” idea entirely. Instead, ask yourself, “Why is my message so important to me?” The answer to that is usually, “Because I know it can help solve a problem for others.” Now, tease out two to three points that can at least begin to help people solve that problem.

An interview is a conversation: Unlike speaking directly to an audience, when you’re talking via a talk show host it’s important to focus on engaging him or her. Do that, and you’ll engage the audience. For radio, have your take-always written down and placed where you can see them, just in case. (You won’t have that option for TV.) If the host asks a question that steers the conversation away from the points you want to make, answer it, but then steer the interview back to your message.

Remember, your interview may be edited: If your interview is not aired live, there are any number of reasons why portions might be edited out. Most of the time it’s because they’re dissatisfied with the interview. Keeping your take-aways pointed and succinct can help prevent that.

For print:

newspaperreporterYour words will be filtered by a reporter: If you’re being interviewed by print journalists, they’re likely taking notes by hand or recording the interview for transcribing later. Either way, what appears in print is subject to the reporter’s understanding and interpretation of what you’ve said. To help prevent a miscommunication, have your take-aways written down so you can be very clear and allow no room for misunderstanding. If the reporter does not have a specialty beat related to your expertise or is with a mainstream publication, as opposed to a trade, avoid using a lot of technical terms and jargon.

Social Media:

Can you share a take-away in 140 characters or less?: The beauty of social media is that you’re in control; the challenge is that you must be self-disciplined about the length of what you write. Twitter limits each post to 140 characters. One study of Facebook found that posts with 0 to 140 characters got far more responses than those with 141 and more. Another study found posts of 100 to 250 characters (about three lines) got 60 percent more response than those with more than 250. Be succinct. If you want to share lengthy material, post a link.

One thing holds true whether you’re giving a talk, an interview or posting on social media: Overtly promoting yourself, your product, company or book is not content that audiences value. They have ads and commercials – often entertaining, multi-million-dollar productions – for that.

Establishing yourself as an expert in your field sets you apart from your competition, which is why publicity is so important to building your brand.

The goal is not to sell, but to share your special knowledge in ways that will benefit your audience. In return, you gain their respect, trust, gratitude, and eventually, their patronage.

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2013 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Monday, April 22, 2013

5 Tips for Being a Great On-Air Guest

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Being in a business that works closely with all of the mass media, I keep tabs on the industry trends. It’s been interesting to watch some of the traditional media, notably hard-copy print, slide as on-line media roars ahead.

OnAirEven more interesting, however, has been seeing how tenaciously radio – talk radio in particular – continues to hold listeners. That’s valuable information for anyone interested in promoting themselves or their business, product or book.

More than 4,000 stations carry news, talk or personality shows and their themes run the gamut, everything from health to consumer news to the paranormal. That news/talk format ranks second only to country music in popularity, so whether your message appeals to a broad audience or a niche group, you’ll likely find them on radio.

Here are a few more updates on talk radio from a report published just last month – the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2013:

• 92 percent of Americans ages 12 and older own a radio or listen at least once a week.
• A third of adults listened to news radio “yesterday.”
• SiriusXM had a record 23.9 million subscribers in 2012.
• 34 percent of Americans listen to streaming AM/FM radio online or Internet-only radio.
• 69 percent of listeners say they “like” or “love” broadcast radio; 75 percent say the same for satellite radio.

That last number makes talk radio an especially powerful medium for people who have a message to spread: Listeners tune in because they’re fans – they want to hear what their favorite host has to say! So guess what? If you’re a guest, they’re listening to that host’s entire interview with you. And you automatically get a bump in credibility: If their favorite host has you on his show, he must think you’ve got something valuable to say.

talkRadioTo ensure those listeners come away agreeing, here are a few tips for being a great guest on talk radio:

Answer questions directly: It’s never a good idea to tap dance around an answer! If you don’t like the question, answer it in a way that steers the conversation back to your message. Hosts don’t have time for tap dancing, so evading questions will mean a quick end to your interview.

Mimic the host: Pay attention to his or her changing tempo and cadence and get in sync with it. Is he slowing down and getting thoughtful? Speeding up to sneak in a few more words before a commercial? Whatever he or she does, take the cue and do the same. It will sound like you and the host have a great rapport, which makes listening more entertaining.

Limit your use of numbers and statistics: If you have one special stat that really drives home your point, use it, but otherwise, avoid numbers – they’re verbal sleeping pills. As you prepare for your interview, look for more entertaining ways to describe what you illustrated with numbers in written materials.

Don’t try too hard: It’s obvious when someone is trying to impress; they over-think, talk too much, and say too little. Relax, stick to select bullet points (don’t try to share everything you know in one interview!) and let your message flow.

Compliment the host: Radio hosts tend to have healthy egos and even those who don’t will appreciate a kind word. Avoid fawning or exaggerating, which comes off as insincere and trying too hard. Rather, you might respond to a question with, “Good question!” or mention how much you enjoy the show. Frequently addressing the host by his or her first name is another subtle form of flattery – a person’s name is the most important word in the world to them. Remembering it and using it are nice ways to show recognition and respect. If you’re responding to callers, use their first names as well.

Talk radio is so much more convenient and less time-consuming than other forms of mass media, and nowadays, your interview can stick around for a good long time. Radio stations often post recordings of shows on their websites, so you can post a link to your interview from your own website and share links on social media. Better yet, get your own copy of the recording to use and share so you’ll always have it.

With every interview, you’ll build credibility and visibility. By posting it on your website, you’ll show visitors that you’re a go-to source for the media. I can’t think of a better way to set yourself apart from your competition.

BONUS Article: Radio Talk Shows
Radio Talk Show Tip
Speak in Soundbites on Radio Talk Shows!
Radio Station Checklist: “Stuff” You NEED to Know & Do BEFORE You Go on the Air!
FREE 25-page eBOOK – “How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest!”

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2013 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

What’s the Good of Talk Radio Appearances if I Can’t Pitch My Product?

Filed under: Promotion,Radio Talk Show Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am
Tags: , , ,

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Here’s how to be a great talk show guest and how you’ll benefit. Sometimes people are surprised – OK, dumbfounded – when I explain that they shouldn’t pitch their product during their radio talk show interview.

“What?” they say. “Isn’t that why I’m on the show??”

Actually, no.

Radio-Talk-Show11Show hosts don’t want to sell your book, product, or services. They want to provide information and entertainment that keep their listeners tuned in and paying attention. If you get on a show and pitch what you’ve got to sell, you’re a commercial – not entertainment. And that’s the fastest way to get your interview cut short or killed entirely.

So what’s in it for you?

Being interviewed on a talk show:

1. Positions you as an expert in your field.
2. Gains you (and your product/company/book) the implied endorsement of mainstream media.
3. Puts your name and the name of whatever you’re selling in front of a large audience.

In return, you give a great interview with useful information, educated opinions and entertaining anecdotes shared with friendly enthusiasm. That way, the talk show hosts keep their listeners tuned in, which helps them sell all those commercial spots – you know, the ones people tune out.

The best way to ensure you have a successful interview is to forget you’ve got something to sell and work your marketing efforts around the goal of being the perfect radio guest. How?

Don’t position yourself as an author or executive. Instead, position yourself as an expert on your topic or your industry. Sell only your depth of knowledge and your ability to help answer key questions about some aspect of your topic that may have been in the news recently. For instance, a realtor can talk about escaping foreclosures. A stockbroker can talk about how to manage your own portfolio. Experts on just about any topic can look to the newspaper and find stories related to their expertise. Find that news story and shape your media pitch around it, and include the fact that you have expertise in the field.

Engage the host. The host is your most important audience. People are usually fans of particular shows because they’re interested in what he has to say, so if you can engage him, you will engage his audience. Talk candidly and openly about your topic in relationship to the current events surrounding it. Make sure your advice is honest as well as conversational, and try to be as natural as possible. Listeners will be able to sense whether your interview is genuine. But don’t worry about entertaining them; entertain the host.

Don’t sell. Stay on topic during the interview, and when appropriate, mention the free material on your website that could benefit the host’s listeners. If you engage the host, give a great interview and offer helpful information, you don’t have to worry about selling anything. The host will do it for you. He’ll make sure his audience knows you’re an expert, he’ll share your website’s address, he’ll mention the name of your book or he’ll talk about the value of your product. He’ll do the promotion for you.

Have a website that does more than sell your product. If you are an author, provide free “tips articles” that explain your topic or your viewpoint in an informational manner. If you’re selling a product, create free reports or articles for your site that lay out the problem your product solves, again, in an educational tone.

With your great interview, you can drive radio listeners to your website in a non-commercial way that doesn’t make you sound like a carnival barker. The host appreciates you not sounding like an infomercial and urges his loyal audience to visit your site. If you’re really good, the host may even ask you back again.

And you achieved all this simply by resisting the instinct to “sell,” and focusing your efforts on helping the radio host offer listeners a good show!

BONUS Article: Radio Talk Shows
Radio Talk Show Tip
Speak in Soundbites on Radio Talk Shows!
Radio Station Checklist: “Stuff” You NEED to Know & Do BEFORE You Go on the Air!
FREE 25-page eBOOK – “How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest!”

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2012 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

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