Authors & Speakers Network Blog with Larry James

Monday, February 22, 2016

How to Connect With a Large Audience

Filed under: Guest Author Articles,Presentations,Speaker Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am

Ty Boyd, Guest Author

The bright lights, the large stage, and hundreds or even thousands of eyes all focused on you to hear what you have to say. On top of that, you have to make sure the people far in the back can hear you so no one loses interest and walks out. All of this is intimidating if you don’t know how to connect with a large audience, whether for a lecture, consultation, or presentation. What is so different between large and small audiences and how do you connect with a large audience?

ConnectLargeAudienceSome of the same techniques work well with both large and small audiences alike. You should still be the one in control, leading the discussion in front of the group. You should still be yourself, because both a large and small audience pick up on you trying to be someone you’re not. However, there are some key things you should be aware of before trying to connect with a large audience.

Scan the whole audience

If there is a large audience, you can’t just pick out one small section and speak to them. Speak to the entire group. Walk around, scan the crowd, and pick out a few sections across the back to gaze on periodically throughout your time on stage. If you focus predominately on one small sect of the group, you will lose the attention of the rest of the audience.

Fake it ‘til you make it

If you are one who struggles with confidence or just with getting in front of a large audience, try to fake confidence by smiling more often and cutting out filler words. Smiling keeps you from looking nervous (even if you’re shaking internally) and the audience responds to that. Cutting out filler words (uh, um, like, etc.) gives the audience more confidence you know what you’re saying and truly believe in the message. If the audience is comfortable with you being up there, you benefit from that and you will naturally “make it” to being the confident one in the lecture hall, presentation room, etc.

Do your research

If you are presenting or lecturing to a group of people with similar interests or work experiences, do your research on that area. Knowing where they are coming from gives you material to use to truly connect with a large audience of people. If you’re talking to a bunch of engineers but don’t know the first thing about physics, there are plenty of resources out there that can help you find some jokes that engineers might find funny. People want to laugh, and if your audience laughs, they will be at ease which will also calm you down.

Don’t rely on subtleties

Subtle messages and gestures are great for small groups but they are lost on large groups. Get rid of that when presenting to a large group and be overly emphatic with your gestures and messages. Larger groups rely on you to pump up the energy in the room, so go big or go home.

Sell with a story

A good way to start is to tell a story the audience can relate to and tie into the message of your presentation or lecture. This is where doing your research, being confident, energetic, and scanning the whole audience comes into play. If you can tie all of the above into a good attention grabber at the start, you are sure to connect with the audience coming out of the gate. Once there, continue to tie in overall concepts, points, or messages back to the story. If done right, all of the points can and will relate to the story so each time one of those points are made the audience as a whole has an “ah-ha!” moment.

Those are just a few of the numerous ways to connect with a large audience. If the above are done right, however, you will have no problem connecting with your audience, keeping them engaged, and getting the message across to everyone in the large lecture hall – all without breaking a sweat yourself!

Copyright 2016 by Ty Boyd, Inc.  –  Ty Boyd, Inc. is an Executive Communications & Coaching business that has helped professionals worldwide reach their career goals for more than thirty years.  Their faculty is comprised of experts in the fields of public speaking, business communications and individual coaching.

They offer a variety of courses suited to meet the needs of all levels of career professionals. Ty Boyd, Inc. also creates custom courses for corporations, designed to align with each company’s business culture and objectives. You can expect immediate returns when you and your company invest in a Ty Boyd, Inc. course or coaching session. Take the lead with Ty Boyd, Inc.

Contact them to learn more about how they can help you, your employees or company. info@tyboyd.com.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Why Is My Book Getting No Attention

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Have you written a great book, but it seems no one beyond your mother and your spouse is interested in it?

You may have one of two problems; or both of them:

1. Your book has wonderful information, or a compelling story, but it lacks a professional polish. If it’s not well organized or written with clear, precise language, it may be hard to read.

A&S-NoATTENTION2. The people who might love your book aren’t aware it exists. Having a website (which is a must) isn’t enough. If you’re not actively engaged in driving people to it, they’re not likely to find it and learn about your book.

Fortunately, both problems have solutions.

First, the writing. If you didn’t have an extensive writing background before tackling your book, and you didn’t have help from a good, professional editor, that could be hurting you. You might want to consider hiring a ghostwriter to revise it.

Ghostwriters provide an array of services, from turning your two-sentence idea into a 150-page book, to sharing writing tasks with you, to editing and polishing what you’ve written. Many, many books being sold today were helped along by ghostwriters, although you’d never know it; their names often don’t show up anywhere on or in the book.

Entrepreneurs and professionals who plan to use their book as a marketing tool can simply hand the job over to the writer. A good ghostwriter can even give you smart suggestions for topics that will work well for you at any particular point in time. And the two of you can collaborate on the content.

Unfortunately, ghostwriting is not a licensed profession; anyone can advertise their services. So, when you’re looking to hire, do your homework. The best way to find a good ghostwriter is through referrals. But you can also find prospects at elance.com or guru.com. Ask about experience and check references. Ask their previous clients how satisfied they were with communications and their end product.

If you’re a professional who intends to elevate your stature; and, ultimately, build customer prospects; with your book, it’s important to hire someone with a strong track record in that area. If you’re a novelist looking for help refining your story, of course, you’ll want someone who has written novels.

For nonfiction books, expect to invest time in answering the writer’s questions. In order for him (or her) to do a great job, he needs to understand who your target audience is and what their needs, problems, concerns and fears are. Once he knows these, he can gather the information necessary to write with them in mind.

And that leads to problem No. 2, marketing. This is such a challenge for writers, I’m making it the focus of my presentation this weekend at the 2012 Northwest BookFest in Seattle.

Too often, writers become so focused on getting their book written, they forget the critical second part of their job: telling people about it.

Some are so confident their book will take off after a few people have read it, they feel they don’t need to worry about marketing. That’s like buying a million-dollar house because you just know you’re going to hit the lottery. Yes, people win lottery jackpots. And yes, books become surprise best-sellers. But no, you shouldn’t bet the farm on either happening.

So while you’re thinking about the audience for your book, think about the marketing messages that will appeal to them. How can you reach them to let them know there’s a new book out there?

Consider these questions:

What will be the best channels for reaching my audience? You might consider doing speaking engagements, or sending pitches to journalists and talk show hosts who would use you as a source of information. You might hire a publicist, contract with your publisher, or put together a book-signing tour. Research the options that appeal to you, including how effective they’ll be in terms of meeting your goals.

How much will it cost? Some options are less expensive, others more. Look into the prices and decide how much you can afford to spend. How much of the work can you handle yourself? Even if you hire a publicist to help, you should plan to invest your own time and energy. To get the best results possible, being active and engaged in your marketing campaign is essential.

Can social media help you spread the word? Actively posting and engaging in conversations on Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites are a great way to build your visibility. The more of a following you have, the more potential audience you’ve created for your marketing message. But remember, “buy my book” posts won’t win you any followers; you need to provide informative and/or entertaining content related to your book.

Remember, it all starts with a well-written and professionally published book. Without a quality product, your marketing efforts are likely to fall flat.

Likewise, your book; no matter how beautiful and polished; won’t go far if people dont know who YOU are.

BONUS Articles: Get The Word Out (Five articles)

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
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Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
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Monday, August 10, 2015

The Importance of the Pause When Speaking

One of the first lessons I learned as a professional speaker was to pause for effect. Learn to use your voice to create impact, suspense and credibility when speaking. Without the pause a speaker’s ideas and messages might even be lost as a result. It’s a signal to our audience that we are moving to a new point. I also use the pause when I move from one main point of my speech to another. It’s important to speak at a reasonable pace – not too fast for the audience to absorb our message, but at the same time, not too slowly as to bore our audience, and cause them to mentally go south.

Keep in mind the pause should be long enough to build suspense. Keep eye contact with your audience to signal that this pause is intentional. You can also use the pause to gain the attention of your audience, by pausing intentionally before you say something important. Comedians are masters of the pause. They often use the pause very effectively just before the deliver the punch line. If you’re using humor in your speech, the timing of your pause is everything.

A&S-PauseMany inexperienced speakers make the mistake of memorizing their speeches word-for-word and then reciting them as quickly as possible, without stopping even to take a breath. An experienced speaker knows to pause periodically to give the audience time to “catch up,” and to allow the meaning of what he or she is saying to sink in.

My friend, Patricia Fripp, CSP, CPAE, interviewed her friend and fellow speech coach, Ron Arden. He shared this helpful explanation of nine types of pauses and how and when to use them.

Powerful and persuasive presenters recognize the importance of the pause. Alan Alda says, “It is the stuff between the lines that makes it a great performance.”

Your message is not simply conveyed by your words, but also by your pauses. A pause isn’t a moment of “nothing.” Used strategically, it is a tool to help you build intellectual and emotional connection with your audience. When you pause, you give your audience time to process what you have just said. A pause allows your listeners to stay engaged and enables them to follow what comes next. If you tend to speak rapidly, it is even more important to allow adequate time for pauses.

Imagine where you would have a comma, period, paragraph, an exclamation point, an underline, or ellipses if your talk were written out. Use this as a guide for pauses.

1. Sense Pause

The sense pause is roughly where a comma would be in writing, but occurs about twice as frequently. This pause is more frequent than the comma because, in writing if your audience cannot understand something they can re-read it. Since this isn’t possible in speaking, you must allow time for your audience to understand. This is a way of grouping words in small “parcels” so they audience can keep up with what you are saying. This pause usually lasts one-half to one second.

2. Transition Pause

The transition pause is approximately where a period would be in writing. It separates one thought from another. Many speakers are unaware that they are speaking in run-on sentences. Audiences are not able to process rapid speech as well as we might think they can, especially if the content is unusual, emotional, poetic, dramatic, or new to the audience. This pause lasts between one and two seconds.

3. Dramatic Pause

A dramatic pause is a pause is used to set up and spotlight what you will say next. For example, “Do you know what happened?”… (pause)… (pause)… (pause)… This heightens tension in your narrative and gets the audience involved. You have to earn a dramatic pause, by following it with a statement that rewards your audience for following along with you. A dramatic pause can be anywhere from three – seven seconds.

4. Reflective Pause

A reflective pause gives your audience time to reflect. Complex or unusual statements need to be followed by time for reflection. This type of pause indicates to your audience, “I want you to think about that…” “I’ve left a space for you to think…” A reflective pause can last from three to seven seconds.

5. Pause for Effect

A pause for effect is shorter, usually one to two seconds. It creates the feeling that something is going to happen and lets words hang in the air so the audience can play with them in their minds.

These last four are advanced uses of the pause you can implement to add finesse to your public speaking.

6. Spontaneity Pause

This pause creates the feeling of spontaneity. This is a technique that conveys you are thinking about your words as you are speaking and not simply reciting something you have said many times before. This will keep you and your audience members interested, even if you are very familiar with what you are saying.

7. Pause to Relinquish Control

This is particularly useful in Q & A situations. When responding to a question, is easy to fall into the trap of rambling, repeating yourself, and weakening your response. Nail your response to the question and then pause to indicate your are finished speaking.

8. Sensory Pause

Use this to support a description that appeals to the senses. For example, “A beautiful warm afternoon… (pause) ….imagine it… (pause) …willows softly rustling in the breeze… (pause) …birds chirping in the trees… (pause) …sitting with a cool glass of lemonade in your hand… (pause). Create heightened feeling in your audience by pausing to allow their senses to take hold.

9. Pause for Emphasis

The enemy of the speaker is sameness. An audience will get bored if they feel like you are saying thing over and over again, even if you are not. Use pauses to delineate your key points. Keep your presentation dynamic so your audience does not get lulled to sleep. Use pauses to change gears.

Remember, a speech is not a monologue unless your audience is asleep or dead. A speech is a dialogue between your words and each audience member’s inner dialogue. Pauses allow your audience members to mentally interact with your words. A skilled speaker will often engage their audience more with their pauses than with their speaking.

Copyright 2015 by Patricia Fripp, CSP, CPAE. My complete interview with Ron Arden is available from my podcasts page: http://www.fripp.com/public-speaking-resources/podcasts/ For additional help with your presentation delivery read: “Sometimes It’s Better Not to Speak,” “Are You Speaking Too Quickly?,” and “Public Speaking – Delivery Strategy.” These are just a few of the many complimentary resources on Fripp.com

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s Pinterest page for authors and speakers at: https://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/authors-speakers-blog/

Saturday, July 25, 2015

Get The Word Out

Paul J. Krupin, Guest Author

The timing of news release actions initially depend on when the books are actually available so you can provide them to the interested media. You can provide galleys, advance review copies, finished books, or new editions.

For your normal book publicity campaign cycle there are five major periods of opportunities:

A&S-GetTheWordOut1. Pre-publication reviews (one dozen galleys needed) – four to six months before book publication.

2. Magazines (100 to 300 advance review copies needed – four to six months before media and book publication) for reviews and feature stories.

3. Publication Announcement Releases – (magazines, daily & weekly newspapers, news services & syndicates) for reviews and feature stories.

4. Post Publication Publicity (all the above plus radio & TV) – more reviews, interviews, and feature stories.

5. Event publicity (newspapers, radio and TV, anytime any place, 20 days lead time needed). Awards, book signings, speaking engagements, workshops, and community activities.

No matter what you do, you should not do publicity unless the business system is in place which allows you to generate income from these activities. Without it being in place, publicity can’t bring you any income, since no one can buy books.

Book publicity per se is one way to go when sending out news releases. The other way to build and implement a publicity plan is to work on personal branding and expert or human interest articles. Here the individual product doesn’t matter.

Your goal is to receive coverage that demonstrates your expertise in a way that results in people wanting everything you offer, no matter what it is. This can be done anytime.

No matter what sort of “news release you choose”, remember that you have to provide what media want the most, which is a proper answer to the question, “What’s in it for my audience”.

BONUS Articles: “Top Tips” for TV and Radio Publicity
Self Promotion – How to Make It Not All About You
3 Ways to Promote Yourself As A Writer (Even When You Don’t Want To)
The Buzz on Being a Shameless NetShaker! – Part 1

Copyright 2015 by Paul J. Krupin. Paul J. Krupin, is President of Direct Contact PR and author of the book, “Trash Proof News Releases.” He is a long time PR Guru who has developed sure-fire proven strategies for getting publicity. www.DirectContactPR.com, The Right Markets, The Right Message, The Right Media.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s Pinterest page for authors and speakers at: https://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/authors-speakers-blog/

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

When Speaking ~ Be Brief

Stephen D. Boyd, Ph.D., CSP, Guest Author

Centuries ago great speakers often spoke two hours and more. But today when sound bytes on television news are the norm and serious problems are solved in an hour on a television drama, audiences are most interested in speakers that get their points across in a short period of time. In a speech delivered to a Women in Communication audience, Patricia Ward Brash said, “Television has helped create an impatient society, where audiences expect us to make our point simply and quickly.”

Today great speakers are noted for their brevity. Billy Graham, in a recent city-wide campaign in Cincinnati, spoke about 20 minutes each night. Theodore Sorensen in his book, “Kennedy,” gave guidelines by which President Kennedy prepared speeches. No speech was more than 20-30 minutes. He wasted no words and his delivery wasted no time. He rarely used words he considered hackneyed or word fillers.

A&SbeBriefAs Purdue communications professor and researcher Josh Boyd wrote, “In physics, power is defined as work divided by time. In other words, more work done in less time produces more power. In the same way, a speaker’s message is most powerful when he [or she] can deliver a lot of good material in a short amount of time.”

Here are guidelines to make brevity a key foundation in your next speech. First, keep your stories under two minutes in length. In preparing a story, continue to ask the question, “How can I say this in less time and in fewer words?” Script out your story and then seek to condense it. There is an adage in using humor: “The longer the story the funnier it had better be.” Connecting this principle to stories in general, we might say, “The longer the story, the more impact it had better have.”

To make sure your stories stay under two minutes, include only information that answers the questions, “Who?” “What?” “When?” “Where?” and “Why?” If it doesn’t answer one of these questions, leave it out. Make sure also that you have a sense of direction in the story. Each part of the story should move toward the conclusion in the mind of the listener. The listener should always feel you are going somewhere in developing your story.

Second, when possible, follow the proverb, “Less is better than more.” Never use three words when you can say it in two. Leave out clichés, filler words, and hackneyed words, such as “You know,” “OK,” and “All right.” Leave out phrases such as “Let me be honest,” or blunt, or frank. Avoid “In other words.” or “To say it another way.” Speak in short sentences, short phrases, and short words. Word choice should be instantly clear to an audience. Make it a goal to make every word have impact in your speech.

SBoyd

For more info, click the book cover!

Third, know the length of your speech by practicing it. Never be surprised by the length of your speech. Never say to an audience, “I’m running out of time, so I must hurry along.” You should know because of your preparation and practice of the speech. To go one step further, if you know the time limit on your speech is 20 minutes, stop a minute short; don’t go overtime. Audiences will appreciate your respect of their time and will think more highly of you as a speaker because of that. You should never be surprised by how long it takes you to deliver a speech

AnecdoteFourth, learn to divide parts of your speech into time segments. Let’s use a 20-minute speech as an example. The introduction should be no longer than 2 minutes. You can get the attention and preview your message easily in that length of time. Avoid opening with generalizations about the weather or the audience. Let the audience know up front that every word you speak counts.

Spend the bulk of your time in the body of the speech. This is where you make your points and give support or evidence for each point. The final two minutes should be your summary and move to action statement. Some speakers have a hard time concluding. When you say you are going to conclude, do so. As one wise person stated, “Don’t dawdle at the finish line of the speech.”

One way to keep your speech brief is to have few points in the body of your speech-no more than three. With a maximum of three points, you will have the self-discipline to condense rather than amplify. In organizing your material, accept the fact you will always have more material than you can cover and that you will only include material that relates to one of the two or three points you plan to make. Trying to cover four to six points will almost invariably make you go overtime in your speech.

A key to success in speaking is not just having something worthwhile to say, but also saying it briefly. We need to follow the speaking axiom, “Have a powerful, captivating opening and a strong, memorable close, and put the two of them as close together as possible.”

BONUS Articles: Ten Lessons on Presentation & Performance You Can Learn by Watching Taylor Swift
Speaking Secrets of Joel Osteen
Speakers: Stay on Time!

Copyright © 2015 – Stephen D. Boyd. – Reprinted with permission. Stephen D. Boyd, Ph.D., CSP, is a professor of speech communication at Northern Kentucky University in Highland Heights, Kentucky. He is also a trainer in communication who presents more than 60 seminars and workshops a year to corporations and associations. See additional articles, resources and contact info at www.SBoyd.com.

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry on Pintrest at: http://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/authors-speakers-blog/

Sunday, April 12, 2015

6 Reasons You Should Self-Publish

Tiana Warner, Guest Author

I was talking with a writer friend recently, and we got into a discussion on traditional publishing vs. self-publishing. She’s been querying agents like crazy. I’ve been doing self-publishing prep like crazy. She was surprised to find out I didn’t even bother trying to get an agent or traditional publishing contract.

Why would I do such a thing? Why would I not even try to get a publisher?

A&Sself-publishingI’ve done a lot of research on the matter, and while both approaches have advantages, I decided self-publishing was a better option for me. Let’s talk about why.

Follow your own timeline

The traditional publishing timeline takes a zen-like level of patience. Realistically, you’re looking at a few months of querying agents, revising your query letter, and querying some more. Once you’ve acquired an agent, she then has to find you a publisher, which takes even more time and patience. Upon acceptance, the timeline for a publishing house is often one, two, or even three years. After all this, you’re not even guaranteed to have a book deal.

Even Queen Rowling got rejected about a dozen times before finally getting published. Life’s too short for that, and what’s “hot” in the book market evolves too quickly. Self-publishing gets your book out there as soon as you want. While I wouldn’t recommend publishing your book the day after you’re done your second draft, it’s motivating to know you can see it in print a few months after completion.

Control your story and platform

When you get picked up by a publishing house, you’re signing over the rights to your book. It’s quite possible that their editor will make you change stuff you don’t want to change—including the title. When you hire your own editor, you have the freedom to decide where to draw the line. It is still your book.

Personally, I like being able to choose the cover of my book, and the price, and where it’s distributed. What if the publishing house gives me a horrendous cover or a $34.00 hardcover copy? What if they want to price my eBook at $15.00? Unfortunately this happens all the time.

Higher royalties

CreateSpace takes about 40% when you sell a paperback. Publishing houses usually take at least 85%, and your agent gets a chunk of what’s left (usually about 15%). There are other means of payment, like advances and flat rates, but in summary, you’re left with about enough to pay rent on the cardboard box you’ll have to live in.

Sure, if you sell a million copies that makes $40,000, but I’d rather sell a million copies at 60% royalty, thankyouverymuch.

The time is right

We’re in an age where self-published books have a better chance than ever of making it big. Print-On-Demand services and free eBook distribution are abound. One in three ebooks sold on Amazon are self-published. You don’t even need to be in a bookstore to be successful.

People don’t care how a book is published, as long as the book is good. If it’s going to explode, it’ll explode, whether or not it’s traditionally published.

Either way, marketing is up to you

Publishing house or not, you’re still responsible for marketing your own work. Yes, sometimes a publishing house helps out with PR and reviews, but it really varies. These days, you’ll likely need to create a marketing plan anyway if you want to impress a publisher enough for them to pick you up.

For me, the chance that a publishing house might help me promote myself is not enough to make me want to forgo the above advantages.

You believe in yourself

Ok, let me get all self-helpy for a minute. Write this on an index card: “I am a bestselling author.” Put it on your fridge. Look at it every day. If you believe wholeheartedly you can achieve something, then it absolutely will happen. I promise.

You’re an organized, driven person who has just written an entire book. You can absolutely put in the work and follow the steps required to publish it. You know there are infinite resources on self-publishing and marketing waiting for you on the web. You have every reason to be confident that you can self-publish your book, without giving up control, royalties, time, and that scene you love so much.

50 Shades was self-published. If 50 Shades can do it, then for the love of all that is holy, you can do it.

Bottom line?

Here’s the thing. No matter what the medium, you need to do research to figure out how to market your book as best as possible. The more you get exposure and reviews, the more you do giveaways and networking and interviews, the better your chances of selling a lot of copies.

Self-publishing does cost more money up front. You’ll need to pay for your own editor, for cover design, and other miscellaneous fees. But if writing truly is your passion then this shouldn’t matter. Hobbies cost money. Startup businesses cost money. Writing is a hobby and a business. Personally, I don’t mind spending money on something I love this much. It’s like an investment in myself, and in the plan that soon I’ll make it back.

To be clear, I’m not against traditional publishing. Books are sexy and I think both approaches win. In fact, maybe a “hybrid” approach is best.

What do you think? What’s your take on self-publishing vs. traditional publishing? Tell us in the comments.

Copyright © 2014 – Tiana Warner. Tiana Warner is a YA fantasy author from British Columbia, Canada. Check out her upcoming novel, Ice Massacre. Tiana enjoys riding her horse, Bailey, and collecting tea cups. She would love to connect with you on Twitter—find her @tianawarner.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
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Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Stories Spice Your Author Appearances

Filed under: Guest Author Articles,Speaker Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am
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Jeff Davidson, Guest Author

Seven minutes. That’s how long studies say an audience’s attention span is for one given topic. If a speaker retains the same posture, voice, or focus, he has little hope of reaching his audience. To keep a high level of interest, many of today’s best speakers add short narratives to their presentations that reinforce a certain point or theme. Some of these stories are personal, some are funny. They all, however, serve to keep a speech dynamic and interesting.

Universal Appeal

Stories are an effective tool because they are something to which we can all relate. One of the most effective ways to grab the attention of an audience is to calmly say, “let me tell you a story.” Immediately, you’ve got them. The association they have with a story being an interesting and entertaining form of communication resonates so deeply that they might not even be aware why they are ready to listen, but the fact is, they will be.

A&SNetStoriesStory topics can range from heavily emotional tales to the frivolities of everyday life, but in all cases they can further a speaker’s point while keeping the audience entertained and engaged. There are several different ways speakers insert stories into their presentations.

Emory Austin, from Charlotte, tells stories of a personal nature that lend insight into the life lessons she has learned. Austin shows portrays to her audience a life filled with experiences to which they can relate. With her comforting, compelling voice she immerses herself completely into the narrative to keep her audience riveted.

Dan Clark, from San Francisco, uses a similar approach by taking his audience through his battle with cancer. He relies upon evoking certain emotions in the audience members to open them up to an understanding of his particular point. Like Austin, Clark uses his personal tales to grab and hold his audience’s attention.

‘Lite’ Could Be Right

Many speakers take a light approach to story telling: some speakers talk about teenagers. This is effective because it is a topic to which everyone can relate. Whether audience members are now parents or simply recall their own teenage years, everyone feels a natural affinity between these stories and their personal experiences.

Tony Alessandra, from La Jolla, often uses quick ‟slice of life” stories that last only a minute or two. These stories succeed at grabbing the audience. Alessandra uses stories that are both entertaining and illuminating, a great way of getting the audience to remember his point. Audience members can take with them a short joke or a story that will serve as a catalyst for remembering the main point of the presentation.

All of these speakers present stories in different manners. Some are funny, some are sad, and some are personal, while others might only be little quirks of life. What they have in common, though, is that they all help make an entertaining and effective speech.

A Quick Example

Here is an example of a story I’ve used about not heeding the advice of others. It takes roughly four minutes to deliver this story to a live audience:

When I was 21 years old, I took a trip to Europe, and using the Eurail Pass, visited numerous countries over the course of 66 days. When I got to Switzerland, a bit tired of planning my own itineraries day after day, I signed up to be part of a small touring van. One of our stops was the quaint town of Zermatt, which was located at the foot of the Matterhorn, one of the tallest, most striking, and majestic mountains in Europe.

One afternoon, walking down from the hotel where we were staying, I didn’t realize that the trek back, after dark, would be a bit more difficult to navigate. The hotel concierge told me it would best to return before dark, and that the trail back could be difficult to navigate. I ignored the advice and stayed in town for quite a while; there was much to see and do.

As I made my way back a little after dusk, the trail looked easy enough to follow, but I had another 30 minutes or so to go. As darkness began to fall, somehow, somewhere along the path, I strayed.

Suddenly, I realized that I had ventured onto some minor path, which could not be correct because it was falling in elevation. Since I had walked down to the village, I needed to walk back up to the hotel. I scrambled around in the semi-darkness for a few minutes, and then heard the sound of rushing water. It had to be one of the many brooks that trickled down from higher elevations.

I came upon a sign that I could barely make out via the moonlight, which was impeded by so many trees and branches. I moved up close to the sign and looked at it from the most favorable angle in terms of illumination. As with most signs in Switzerland, it contained the same message in four languages. The first would be in French, the second German, the third Romanish, and the fourth English. I settled on the English message, which said, “Warning: This area subject to flash flooding. Move to higher elevation immediately.” That was all I needed to know.

I scrambled through the brush and the bushes as fast as I could, getting scratched and cut, here and there, but who cared? In a matter of about 90 seconds, I had made my way to higher ground, where the sound of the rushing water was growing more and more faint.

Gosh, that seemed like a close one. Eventually, I found the larger path, made my way back to the hotel, and related the story to my van-mates. So much for venturing off without a flashlight, map, compass, or any idea of what I was doing.

story1Did You Come on the Trip with Me?

It would be easier and more effective to tell you this story in person, than to type it up and have you read it. Still, while you were reading, did you “come on the trip with me?” If so, then the story worked, for both of us!

To begin finding your stories, look no further than your own past. You can start by walking yourself through the memories of your earliest days. Review pictures, yearbooks, and school notebooks; there are stories in them all. Don’t worry about how they’ll fit in your speech or what point they could assist you in making. You will find that a good story fits into several different contexts and can be used in a variety of circumstances. The important thing is to begin to collect your stories.

Once you have amassed a library of these stories, you can begin to work on the best of them. You’ll find that you can recall them easily with only a keyword or two, so that you can carry them all with no more than an index card of cell phone screen. Then, when you’re preparing for a speech, you can pick two or three that fit easily with your topic and your audience. Your meeting participants will be appreciative.

JeffDavidson

Jeff Davidson

Copyright © 2014 – Jeff Davidson. Jeff Davidson, MBA, CMC, aka “the work life balance expert” works with busy people to increase their work-life balance, so that they can be more productive and competitive, and still have a happy home life. He is the author of Breathing Space, Simpler Living, and Dial it Down, Live it Up. He is a columnist for Association News, Accounting Web, CPA Practice Digest, Insurance Business America, The Practical Lawyer, Physician’s Practice, Public Management, and Human Resources IQ. Visit www.BreathingSpace.com.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
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Monday, February 23, 2015

Why Self-Promotion is Critical to Your Success

Debbie Allen, Guest Author

When my friend, Larry James stated, “I’m such a shameless self-promoter,” I laughed. Then I thought for a moment and I realized that I’m a shameless self-promoter, too. I had never thought of my marketing approach as being shameless before. I would have described myself more like the “Marketing Energizer Bunny.”

I just keep on marketing and marketing and doing whatever it takes to make it happen. I had never thought of this as shameful unless it’s shameful to believe in something so much that you want to tell everyone you meet. I call it good marketing!

A&SSelfPromoteGrowing up in a family of entrepreneurs, my father taught me that the first step in
marketing success is to have a strong belief in yourself and your organization. No matter how crazy other people may think your ideas are, you must believe strongly enough to never give up.

How can you be successful if you don’t believe in yourself and what you have to offer to your customers? You can’t! Therefore the first step in shamelessly successful self-promotion is to develop a strong belief system. After writing my best selling book, Confessions of Shameless Self-Promoters™, I began to survey my audiences to see how many believe in promoting themselves. It amazed me to discover that on an average 87% or more did not feel comfortable promoting themselves. If you don’t promote yourself it goes against the grain of all sales and marketing. Right?

You might not feel comfortable promoting yourself , much less doing it shamelessly. Well, let me tell you what the word shameless means in Debbie Allen’s dictionary: Promoting yourself everywhere in the service of others. Now does that sound self-serving, pushy or intrusive?

selfpromotecartoon2Much of what we believe to be true about self-promotion comes from past programming that dates back to childhood. Most of us grew up being told, “It’s not polite to talk about yourself.” Therefore, you thought that it would be rude to self-promote. Most of us have also experienced ineffective self-promotion that was ego driven and self-serving. Yet, that is simply an ineffective way to promote yourself. That type of self-promotion turns people off.

• Do you feel passionate about helping your clients get the best experience possible?
• Do you feel that your services are better than your competitors?

If you answered YES to either of these questions, you should be shouting it from the roof tops and giving more people the opportunity to do business with you. If you don’t promote yourself and your services you ROB your customers from the opportunity of doing business with someone who truly cares about their best interests.

BONUS Articles: Self Promotion – How to Make It Not All About You
The Buzz on Being a Shameless NetShaker!
Self-Promote or Disappear!

DebbieAllenCopyright © 2015 – Debbie Allen. Debbie Allen, CSP, has been a professional speaker and marketing expert for over 20 years and is one of the highest paid professionals in the industry of speaking and consulting today. Debbie Allen, CSP, has achieved the honor of CSP (Certified Speaking Professional) by the National Speakers Association and National Speakers Federation, making her one of the top professional women speakers worldwide. She is an award-winning entrepreneur with four decades of experience in building and selling million dollar companies as an expert in numerous diverse industries. Visit her Website: http://BuildYourExpertise.com/

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
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Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
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Saturday, February 7, 2015

Using Social Media to Boost Book Signings

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Whether your book is a nonfiction marketing tool for your brand or business, or the newest release in your writing career, staging book signings can help build your audience.

It’s an age-old practice that has changed – as with almost everything in the publishing industry – due to social media and other online tools. Not only do platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+ make it easier to promote your signing, they also provide new opportunities for maximizing the return on your investment.

A&SNetbooksigningsBook signings, which can include an informative or interesting presentation or demonstration, have always held more value than meets the eye. Here are three benefits that may not have occurred to you:

• They get your book into shops that might not otherwise carry it. Bookstores are choosy; their numbers are declining (there were reportedly 10,200 nationwide in 2011) and they have many books from which to choose – more than 730,000 new titles a year, including traditionally and self-published print and e-books.

• The store may create a special display featuring your book – especially if you ask! If that happens, you just got valuable free merchandising.

• The store will likely promote your book signing, including sending announcements of the event to its customers and local publications. Anything the store does in that regard is also great marketing for you!

While it’s nice if the store promotes your book signing, you owe it to the shop and yourself to do all you can as well. The more people who come to the event, the more books you sell and the more likely the store will invite you back again. This is where social media can help.

Here are some tips for spreading the word online:

• Get into local social media groups and “communities” that are built around shared interests relevant to your book. For instance, if you were doing a book signing in the Tampa area for a marketing book, you could join LinkedIn’s Tampa Bay Marketing Professionals group. (Do not simply start announcing your event though!) Instead …

• Share a short article with useful information that links back to your website, where the event announcement is prominently displayed with details about your valuable presentation.

• Join in a conversation on any of the platforms, or start a new one, and casually mention along the way that you’ll be in that city speaking and signing books.

• For groups on any of the large social platforms, let the group’s manager or administrator know you have an event coming up that will be of interest to his/her members and ask if he’ll share that information or allow you to.

• Buy ads – for very little money! – on LinkedIn or Facebook announcing your event.

• On LinkedIn, click the “Promotions” tab near the top of the group’s page and you’ll be taken to another page where promoting to that group is welcomed.

• During your event, be sure to have someone take photos that you can share on your social media networks. Photos of you engaging with readers or enthusiastically giving a presentation not only give you more visibility, they make your event look like fun!

One last word of advice: Don’t get discouraged if throngs of fans don’t turn out – believe me, it happens to even well-known authors! Instead, remember all that you’ve accomplished simply by arranging the event.

If traffic is slow, you can make good use of your time by introducing yourself to some of the shop staff and engaging them in conversation. They just might remember the friendly author they chatted with the next time they’re asked for a book recommendation.

BONUS Articles: 40+ Ways to Make Your Next Book Signing an EVENT!!
How to Book a Book Signing And Other Important Stuff!
Book Signing Strategies
Getting Into Bookstores? – 7 Tips to Help You!

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
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Friday, January 30, 2015

Tips for Making the Most of Your Print Interview

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Getting media exposure means putting yourself out there. It might be chatting live on the air with a radio talk show host, taping an appearance for TV, or being interviewed by a print journalist.

Some people enjoy print because they have more time to ponder their answers. But it makes others (me included!) nervous. I worry about how the reporter will interpret my responses, and how they’ll be sliced, diced and repackaged for an article.

PrintInterviewThere are things you can do, though, to ensure your print interview goes well; that the reporter understands you, and you get your message across. Here are 5 tips:

Do NOT try to pitch, sell or promote your book, product or business:

Yes, it may be the reason you’re granting interviews, but if you want to sell something, you should buy an ad. The journalists are looking for you, as someone with a particular expertise, to provide content for their readers. That may be adding another voice to a story with multiple viewpoints. Or it may even be sharing your story – how you reinvented yourself after being laid off, or how you managed to write a novel while raising 13 kids. Either way, the goal of the journalist is to write an article that’s useful, informative and/or entertaining. Your goal is to get media exposure: your name and the source of your expertise in front of thousands, perhaps millions, of eyes.

Try to speak clearly and at a moderate pace:

Whether the reporter is taking notes with a pen or a computer, it will be difficult for him or her to keep up if you get excited and start talking very quickly. Not only might he miss some of the brilliant things you have to say, he may (gulp!) make an error that becomes a misquote in the story. Speak at a conversational speed, and if you really want to be a big help, offer to spell any less-than-obvious names you toss out. A good reporter will double-check the spelling, but you’ll save her time by giving her a starting point.

You don’t have to answer immediately, and you don’t have to answer every question:

Most of us would be hard put to respond off the top of our heads to, “What was the most pivotal moment of your life?” If you can’t, don’t. Ask the reporter to give you some time to think about it. By the same token, if you don’t feel qualified to answer a question, it’s far better to be honest about that than to take a stab at a response that makes you sound, um, unqualified. Remember, you’re in control. No one will think less of you if you politely decline a question for which you have no answer!

Take your own notes before the interview:

You likely have a good idea of what the reporter is writing about – and if you don’t it’s perfectly acceptable to ask what the gist of the story is. That gives you time to prepare relevant comments. If they’re looking for tips, list a few on paper in case you draw a blank. That will also help you plan ahead so you can speak concisely and get to the point quickly. Personal anecdotes always add color and interest to a story. Think about whether you’ve got a good short one (short is appreciated!) that will illustrate your point.

Be prepared to email a high-resolution photo of yourself:

Print publications cannot use the low-resolution photos that look so sharp online; the files are too small to reproduce at any decent size on paper. Most require an image that’s 300 dpi (dots per inch). Keep one of yourself at the ready to send via email, if the reporter asks, as soon as the interview is over. Not having it – or not knowing what a high-resolution photo is – could mean a missed opportunity to get your name, book title and face in front of a big audience.

Sound easy? You’re right, it is. So relax and enjoy your interview.

Before you know it, a Google search of your name will produce dozens of publications quoting you and mentioning your product, business or book. That may lead to even more requests, all of which build your profile and your audience.

Stop the presses!

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

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