Authors & Speakers Network Blog with Larry James

Thursday, September 3, 2015

When Ideas Run Dry, But The Blog Deadline Beckons

Filed under: Author Tips,Blogging,Blogging Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am
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Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

A well-written and regularly updated blog is a great marketing tool for variety of reasons.

A blog drives people to your website, helps you build your personal or company brand, and allows you to develop a relationship with customers or readers.

A&SIdeasRunDryBut let’s face it, the blog that you vowed to update every two or three weeks can seem like another mind-numbing chore as time passes and your enthusiasm wanes.

What’s worse is that, pretty soon, you start running out of material. After all, you already covered everything obvious and worthwhile, right? What’s left to write about?

Plenty, as it turns out. You just need to put yourself in a position to attract great ideas and snag them as they whiz by. Let me nudge you in a few directions that should help feed the blog beast that haunts your doorstep every couple of weeks or so.

One thing we do regularly at EMSI, and you should, too, is follow the daily news to see what’s creating a stir nationally, internationally or within your industry. For example, the debate over whether the mountain in Alaska should be called Denali or Mt. McKinley could be fodder for someone who blogs about mountain climbing, the outdoors or, perhaps, presidential history.

You also should check social media to see what topics have people the most excited. Twitter and Facebook track trending topics that are generating a lot of buzz, and those could provide jumping off points for your next blog entry.

I would also suggest that stealing from yourself is perfectly acceptable. Revisit old ideas from blogs past, but give them a fresh approach. Even newspapers and magazines will resurrect topics they previously wrote about, wagering that few readers will care or recall that the same subject was explored two or three years ago. You can do the same.

And remember, there’s no need to wait until the last minute to start formulating ideas. Keep an ongoing list, adding to it whenever a topic pops into your head.

Once you decide on a topic, here are a few tips for fleshing it out into a quality blog entry and for attracting the greatest number of readers:

Online searches are your friends. Background information about your topic is just a search phrase away using Google or another search engine. Look for real-life examples or recent news on your subject to add depth and reinforce your point of view. Just make sure your sources are legitimate. You will want to cite those sources, too, because that will add to the credibility of your post.

BLOGcartoonStatistics, studies and surveys. Specific numbers and recent studies also bolster the points you want to make. You could, for instance, write that “there are a lot of libraries in the U.S.” But it’s less vague and more impressive to write: “The American Library Association estimates there are 119,729 libraries in the U.S.” While you can often track down surveys, studies and data with a general Google search, you also can zero in on specific websites. For example, if you are writing about a medical topic, the Centers for Disease Control provides numerous statistics about how many people suffer from various maladies.

Integrate SEO keywords. People search the Internet using keywords or phrases they hope will uncover articles or websites with the information they want. The more you understand which keywords could bring the highest amount of traffic to you, the better, so research what might work best. You can integrate those keywords into a headline or the body of the blog entry. Keywords shouldn’t be too generic, though, or else your blog will be lost in a blizzard of other blogs, websites and news articles that use the same words.

Coming up with and carrying out great blog ideas on a regular basis certainly presents a challenge, but not an insurmountable one.

How do I know? I’m always on the lookout for ideas myself. For example, at EMSI we noticed that many bloggers were on the Internet discussing the struggles they have generating ideas.

And, voila, I had a topic for this week’s PR Insider!

BONUS Article: Scribble, Scribble… Write, Write!

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2015 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

P.S. from Larry James ~ Blogs are also a great tool for launching a publicity campaign! If you need help getting the greatest mileage out of your blogs, give her a call at 727-443-7115 ext. 215 or simply reply to this e-mail: prinsider@emsincorporated.com

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s Pinterest page for authors and speakers at: https://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/authors-speakers-blog/

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Writing a Book: Where Do You Begin?

Filed under: Author Tips,Blogging Tips,Creativity,How to Write — Larry James @ 7:30 am
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Are you ever afraid you will run out of ideas when writing?

If you’re tired of skimming your community newspaper or trolling the shelves of your public library for article ideas, you’re a pretty typical writer. Ideas to write about are everywhere. Try observing, reading, listening and paying attention to life in general. You must be committed to writing and to never running out of ideas if you want to write a book.

MessyDeskWhen I wrote my first book, I decided it should have 10 chapters. I started by titling each chapter then started writing in the chapter that I knew would be the easiest to start. My second book became total of 333 different topics about relationships. Some topic were long some were short but when it came time to put them all together I had enough topics for a 310 page relationship book.

“Don’t be afraid to start somewhere in the middle. Write the pieces that are flowing for you. That may not be the introduction or chapter one. It might be chapter twelve. Trust your flow and write what’s coming.” ~ Marnie Pehrson

Because people love to find easy-to-follow instructions and “how to” books to help them accomplish something, the relationship book became my best seller. There was something there for everyone. It got the attention of a producer on ABC TV’s “The View.” Four months later Barbara Walters interviewed me and the book went national.

I have a special file in my computer labeled, “Fresh Ideas.” There you will find anywhere from a couple of lines or a paragraph or two of an idea about another topic to write about. Whenever I need an idea I pop open that file. Usually there are quite a few ideas and perhaps a couple of lines to get me started on something new. Often I will nurture these ideas, maybe writing an additional line or thought about them, then let the idea go again to stumble across it at a later date.

ideaI also have a file basket on my computer desk. Mooch from magazines. Often I can be seen at a fast-food joint skip-reading a few magazines that I seem to never have time to read at my office. Keep your notepad handy when reading magazines and newspapers. Use a voice recorder. I always take notes while reading, these quick ideas which may seem unimportant at first will be invaluable in the future.

When an idea comes, I scribble some notes and toss it in the file basket on my computer desk. I will often revisit a story I’ve already written and come up with new angles for other markets. I will re-slant the article accordingly. Use your own creative imagination. I will also often get an idea from driving past a billboard. Sometimes just a few words will pop out at me. I make notes for later. I never run out of ideas.

Read bumper stickers. Pay attention to advertisements. Advertisements tell a story in a few short words. Restate the idea in your own words, then expand it. Again, the ads show the current trends. Read a variety of magazines, because you never know what may hit you.

A trip down the Hallmark or American Greetings aisle promises to generate ideas about the range of human emotions. You don’t have to buy them to get ideas from the text and artwork. Making ideas happen isn’t easy and requires patience, determination and hard work.

Join an authors group. Brainstorm with other writers. Jotting down even two words is usually enough to trigger the idea when you’re ready to start working on an article later. When I read something that someone else has written about the topic I am pursuing, ideas of my own pop into my head; sometimes they are my interpretation of what I just read, but are in my own words. Because something similar has already existed, doesn’t mean you can’t make an improvement on it.

“While most people complain about standing in line or waiting for the doctor or dentist, I consider waiting an opportunity. The next time you find yourself waiting for something, instead of pacing and griping, tune into your own thoughts. It’s amazing what can occur to you if you’ll just quiet your mind. Pay attention to what’s going on around you. In other words, eaves drop.” ~ Patricia Fry

If you are committed to writing, you will need a constant flow of new ideas for articles. Write what you know best or about things you want to know more about. You need only to take a look at your own life to find ideas. If what you’re reading, watching, or listening to doesn’t directly relate to what your looking for for a blog or article, you should always try to find a way to relate it to your business or to the topic at hand.

You can use the same formula for books. Write enough articles on the same subject and after a while you will have enough material for a book! Things I’ve blogged about can be put together to form a book.

BONUS Article: Scribble, Scribble… Write, Write!
50 Ways for Writers to Find Article Ideas

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Copyright © 2013 – Larry James. Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Should All Authors Blog?

Rachelle Gardner, Guest Author

A few years ago, the standard wisdom was that authors, both fiction and non-fiction, should have blogs in order to gather an audience and build relationships with readers. Now, not so much. As social media and online marketing have evolved, my thoughts on blogging have changed. I think each author needs to carefully consider whether blogging is an appropriate vehicle for them based on:

whattoblog1. If they can do it well;

2. If they enjoy it; and

3. If their writing career can benefit from it.

If blogging doesn’t suit you, don’t spend too much time trying to make it work.

Why aren’t blogs the appropriate vehicle for all authors?

The proliferation of blogs in the last five years has made it increasingly difficult to stand out in the crowd.
Many authors are blogging faithfully but it doesn’t seem to be increasing readership of their books.
Many authors seem to be blogging to an audience that’s mainly other writers.
Many authors have a hard time figuring out what their blogs should be about (mostly fiction authors).
So, how do you decide if you should have a blog? Here are my thoughts:

Have a blog if:

1. You have something important to say and it seems people want to hear it.

2. You understand that blogging is about offering something of value, NOT about promoting yourself and your books.

3. You enjoy blogging (for the most part, anyway).

4. You find blogging contributes to your creativity and enthusiasm for writing your books, rather than sucking all the energy out of you.

5. You can find the time for blogging without it completely stressing you out.

6. Your books have a highly defined target audience, making it easy to target your blog.

7. Your books are topical (especially non-fiction), so that you have a clear and obvious theme for your blog.

Don’t have a blog if:

1. You keep asking yourself and others, “But what should I blog about?”

2. You only want to blog to promote your books and/or because you think you “have to.”

3. The whole idea stresses you out.

4. You honestly don’t have the time in your schedule to blog regularly.

5. You’ve been blogging for a year or more, and haven’t built up to a traffic level that seems worth it.

Nowadays there are numerous alternatives to blogging when it comes to online networking and promotion.

For example:

E-mail newsletters
Using Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc., more effectively
Leveraging all the various ways Goodreads offers for promoting books
Learning how to attract a readership through Pinterest & Instagram
Having an effective LinkedIn profile page
Connecting with readers on Google+

Copyright © 2012 Rachelle Gardner, Literary Agent. Rachelle Gardner is an agent with Books and Such Literary Agency, representing both fiction and non-fiction. She’s looking for mainstream commercial projects for both the Christian and general markets. In non-fiction and memoirs, she looks for authors with established platforms, strong marketing hooks and an understanding of how to use social media. Non-fiction authors must have a book proposal and three sample chapters to be considered. She’s also seeking all kinds of fiction, and authors must have a completed manuscript to be considered.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

letsbefriends2

Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s Pinterest page for authors and speakers at: https://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/authors-speakers-blog/

Sunday, March 18, 2012

10 Reasons Why You Should Write Blog Posts to Promote Your Book and Business

Filed under: Blogging Tips,Guest Author Articles,Promotion — Larry James @ 8:00 am
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Judy Cullins, Guest Author

Why write blog posts that promote you and your book? Now that the dust has settled and you realize you need to do more promotion for your book and your business, let’s look at one way that has been proven to work over the past 12 years since article marketing emerged. That’s blogging.

Blogging is a top marketing strategy that sets you apart from your competition. You can add a blog to your business site or install a version (I recommend WordPress) for a separate site.

Internet blog conceptIn your specific niche blog website, you create focused information to share with your target audience–the ones who wants solutions for their concerns, information they can use, and for fiction, entertainment and education.

For instance, at my website/blog my focus is on book coaching. I share all kinds of information on the writing parts of books, the publishing parts, and the online marketing parts, to include social media, web marketing and blogging. When you create a blog, you use social media marketing to bring your audience running to your blog site to see what else you have to offer. So here’s some reasons to get going on this proven strategy.

1. Because, this form of content marketing educates your target market on what you can offer them to make their world better.

Education (content) marketing has been a top business trend over the past years. That’s a green light to consider it. We know that another way to educate your audience is with an eBook or print book to attract future clients. You may have one published already.

2. Because, blogs show you off as a real person, with real interests others may enjoy and want more of.

It’s great to share one of your early mistakes that you solved. You show your humility and your strengths in the same post.

3. Because, when you ask for comments from your blog visitors, you inspire people to leave one for you too.

You always have to ask for action in any content you give away. When you answer their comments or questions, you build relationships. People are attracted to these conversations. It’s lonely there without any comments.

4. Because, at the end of each blog post, you can put a link to lead your visitors to your subscription page that builds your mailing list, or even to a product or service page.

Thus, you can continue to promote to and stay in touch with these opt-in subscribers. The ideal? Create a ratio of 3 informational pieces to 1 promotional piece that you email to your mailing list or shopping cart list (databases).

5. Because, when you consistently create useful information for your audience, they will see you as the savvy expert in your business niche.

People will trust your book and business because you’ve given them a sample of you. Like Mrs. Field’s chocolate-chip cookies-her millions came from giving out samples to customers.

6. Because, when you consistently share your fiction characters and their conflicts, you engage your blog readers to want more of other fiction you write. Readers love conflict.

Conflict fuels action. Action-filled fiction books as well as non-fiction books motivate your readers to keep reading until they finish. When they finish your book, they become your 24/7 fan club that give you good word of mouth promotion.

2blogorNOT7. Because, this kind of marketing is free after you set up your WordPress blog.

You can add a WordPress blog to your business website where you may have sales pages that sell your books, other products, or services. With a good sales message and great marketing with a blog, you will be amazed at how your profits will grow.

8. Because, you will spend far less time promoting online with blog posts.

It only takes me about an hour to write a 600-700 word post. Editing takes another day via email with a partner, and by the 3rd day, it’s up and running. I do all the writing, and my VA does the submitting and any other techie skills I don’t know. Results? Big increases to your blog/site that helps you attract sales.

9. Because, blog posts work well with other social media marketing.

You can Tweet a benefit or two or the topic of the post first. For example, “Build book sales with a blog” Follow it with a URL that takes your reader back to your blog or website. This 140 character message can be automatically sent to your Facebook page and your LinkedIn profile page by using HootSuite. This is better than submitting your content to ezine article directory. It’s a direct hit to your target audience. .

10. Because, this is viral marketing at its best. Search engines like blogs.

They list your blog post title and then, your blog site gets more visitors interested in what else you offer. Many of your blog posts will have powerful key words in their titles to further rank you on page 1 or 2. When you get your blog titles on page 1, you are at the top of your competition.

Like me, once you get going, you’ll love this marketing because you don’t have to go out and tell or sell with talks and live interviews that can mean travel in these difficult times.

No panty hose, even no shoes if you like. If you are an author you are already a writer, and these blog posts can come directly from your book chapters. This is easy marketing because you don’t have to invent your content from scratch.

And, if you don’t know how good your blog post is, check with a writing coach to give you feedback that can cut your learning curve in half and speed your writing to be able to produce at least one blog post a week.

BONUS: WordPress Videos – Hundreds of videos that will help you with your WordPress.com Blog. WordPress Tutorials
5 Reality Checks: Author Bloggers CAN Sell Books

Copyright 2012 by Judy Cullins. – Reprinted with permission. Judy is an author, publisher, and book coach. She helps writers manifest their book dreams. More than 25 clients published since 1999! “Write Your eBook or Other Short Book-Fast!” – www.bookcoaching.com. Send an e-mail to Subscribe@bookcoaching.com. The Book Coach Says… For 2 FREE eReports send e-mail to: Judy@bookcoaching.com.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

letsbefriends2

Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Monday, August 15, 2011

101 Ways to Blog as a Book Author – Plus More

Filed under: Author Tips,Blogging Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am
Tags: ,

John Kremer, Guest Author

We all know that blogging is one of the best ways to get attention in today’s Internet world. A blog is a godsend to your website, bringing it traffic, fans, and more. But you have to post regularly: twice a week or more.

Stuck for what to blog about? Here are some tips for novelists, but the same tips can apply to writers of nonfiction, memoirs, children’s books, business books, and more.

Larry’s Note: Every link in the following list opens in a new browser window so you won’t lose your place!

1. Review other novels or books in your field, especially from other lesser-known novelists or book authors.
2. Write a blog post using the voice of one of your main characters. For nonfiction authors, write a blog post using the voice of Abraham Lincoln, Gandhi, Plato, Teddy Roosevelt, Dr. Oz. Henry David Thoreau or some other famous person in your field.
blogging3. Have that main character tell some side stories not included in the novel. For nonfiction authors, you can tell stories you did not feature in your book, especially new testimonial stories you receive.
4. Write about the setting – time and/or place. Use some of the research you did to ensure that your novel was accurate.
5. Invite your readers to review your book. Feature their testimonials on your blog.
6. Interview some of your readers: via Q&A text or via an Internet radio show or via a teleseminar.
7. Podcast your book, one section at a time.
8. Write about trends in your genre or subject area.
9. Write about your favorite novelists (especially those that write in your genre) or book authors in your field. Include their photos and a sampling of their books.
10. Answer questions from your readers.
11. Fill in the back stories of some of your minor characters.
12. Write a new story featuring one of those characters.
13. Feature excerpts from your upcoming novels or books. Ask for feedback.
14. Link to the blogs of your favorite authors. Tell readers why those blogs would interest them.
15. Link to book review sites. Recommend your favorites.
16. Create a hall of fame for your genre or topic. Of course, include yourself. For a sample, see my Self-Publishing Hall of Fame.
17. Write a blog for each of your upcoming book signing events, online events, etc. Invite your readers to attend – or to let their friends know about your events.
18. Write a follow-up blog on each of your events describing what happened. Take photos of the event and post them here.
19. Review book trailers for novels you like (or other books as well). Feature the book trailer videos in the blog post. Here’s an incredibly easy book trailer any author could duplicate in a few minutes: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2010/12/cool-book-trailer-incredibly-easy-to.html.
20. Write about your writing routine. Describe when you write (morning, evening, weekends), where you write (the proverbial garret, a coffee shop, at the kitchen table), and how you prepare to write (eat a banana, listen to music, kick your husband or wife out of the house). You could easily stretch this out into three or four short blog posts.
21. Share the genesis of your novel or nonfiction book. How did it come about? What ideas, events, characters, etc. inspired you to write the book?
22. Describe how you went about plotting your novel. For nonfiction authors, describe how you went about organizing the book, why you included some things and excluded other info.
23. Write about a hobby you have.
24. Write about a cause that’s important to you: charitable, political, social, ecological, or spiritual.
25. Write about your spouse, your children, or other members of your family.
26. Write about your town, your state, your country, your world, your galaxy.
27. Opine on the state of the nation. Opine on world affairs.
28. Opine on Weiner, Schwarzenegger, Sheen, and other fools. You can relate it to what you know, like I did on this post about Weiner and Twitter: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/06/twitter-how-easy-is-it-to-fake-account.html.
29. Write about a hot issue, especially one that relates to the content of your novel or book.
30. Describe how you go about doing research for your novel or book. Book research? Google? Websites? Travel?
31. Share some of the interesting tidbits, facts, insights you discovered as you did your research. Share things that didn’t make it into your novel or book. Share the facts that became key items in your book.
32. Review books, websites, blogs, courses, or events on writing, research, plotting, etc. that you like. Feature the book covers or banner images in the blog post.
33. Share or review the novels or books you are reading now. What’s on your nightstand? What’s in your purse or briefcase? What books did you take to the shore during vacation?
34. Survey your readers opinions on any key issue in your books. You could do a number of posts. Announce the surveys. Then promote the surveys. Then announce the results. That’s worth at least three blog posts, probably more.
35. Run a contest. Ask people to name their favorite character and describe why they like the character. For nonfiction books, ask readers to describe the most important tip they learned from your book. Offer a free book, sample chapter from your new novel or book, a phone call from you, or something else as a prize.
36. Feature your reader comments in upcoming blog posts.
37. Have your readers interview you. Encourage them to send in a series of questions you will answer.
38. Ask your readers to pick which character in your novel is most like them. For nonfiction books, ask your readers to tell you which story you told most touched them.
39. Tell your readers which character in your novel is most like you. For nonfiction authors, let them know which story has most meaning to you – and why.
40. Interview bloggers.
41. Interview booksellers.
42. Interview a celebrity in your field.
43. Interview a major celebrity that has a passion for your field. For example, interview a movie star that loves dogs or is a vegetarian or fights for the preservation of the ocean. In this example, the celebrity should be passionate for the topic you write about.
44. Feature your favorite bookstores (with photos). Describe why you love them.
45. Interview your favorite novelists or book authors.
46. Write a ditty. Write a poem. Share a short story.
47. Expose your inner being. Share your feelings.
48. Let readers know about your day.
49. Post photos or videos of your favorite novelists and other book authors. Write a little introduction.
50. Join in the Amazon Bestseller Campaigns of your fellow authors. Promote these campaigns via your blog
51. Join in the blog tours of your fellow authors. Promote these blog tours via your blog.
52. Have a reader interview one of your characters with you responding as the character. For nonfiction authors, have readers send in a list of questions for an expert to answer. Ask the expert to respond via your blog.
53. Report about the launch parties and other promotional activities of your fellow authors.
54. Have readers vote for variations of your book covers and/or book titles.
55. Write guest posts on other blogs. It’s a great way to exchange blog posts with other authors. Plus, of course, it exposes you, your book, and your blog to other readers.
56. Post photos of your readers and fans. Feature them reading your book.
57. Run a contest asking readers to send you photos of them reading your book in unusual places: foreign locations, mountaintops, in the water, at the dining room table, in a restaurant, while standing in line for the latest version of the iPhone, while dancing a jig, at a location featured in your novel or book, up a tree, down a sewer, at the zoo (perhaps with a monkey reading your book, in a bookstore.
58. Feature photos of yourself with your book in the same locations. Have fun with it. Make it a game for yourself.
59. Feature tweets and Facebook posts about your book.
60. Create a controversy. Comment on a news story, blog post, current event, historical event, website, or tweet. Say something outrageous and let ‘er rip.
61. Write about a service you used in writing or promoting your book. Tell your readers why you liked or did not like the service.
62. Share a quote you like. For example, see http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/03/whats-important-heres-one-way-to-decide.html.
63. Share your tweets or Facebook posts. At least several times a month, I feature some of my most important or useful tweets with the readers of my blog. For example, see http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/06/book-marketing-tweets-you-can-use-june_20.html.
64. Write a how-to post. For novelists, tell people how to cook a dish featured in your novel, or how to sew a corset, or how to sail the seven seas, or how to spot a vampire (something, obviously related to your novel). For nonfiction authors, feature tips or how-to advice related to your book.
65. Create videos. Post them to YouTube and then embed them in a blog post. Check out this video I created on advertisements in eBooks: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/04/ebook-advertisments-video-reveals-7.html.
66. Share any video that inspires you, even if it is off-topic. Here’s recent blog post I wrote that featured an up-and-coming viral video: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/06/dance-like-no-one-is-watching-next.html. Watch the video. You’ll be glad you did.
67. Create a video channel playlist and embed it on your blog. There are many tools to do this. Here’s one example: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/03/google-gadget-showcases-your-youtube.html.
68. Share a song you really like. Link to a music video on YouTube or a link to a music site where people can buy the song. Minutes after Susan Boyle’s video went viral on YouTube, I shared a link because I found her signing and story so inspirational.
69. Share a photo you really like. Something like this wonderful library desk made of books: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2010/09/cool-library-desk-created-completely.html.
blogging170. Feature an excerpt from a magazine article you liked. For instance, see Books add warmth to any room (from Allure magazine): http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/04/books-add-warmth-to-any-room-miles-redd.html.
71. Offer a freebie for download. I offered a collection of quotations in the form of an eBook: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/04/quotations-from-john-kremer-get-book.html.
72. If you have more than one blog, feature blog posts from your other blogs. Besides this blog, I also blog at AskJohnKremer.com, AskThePublicist.com, AskTheBooksellers.com, AskTheBookPrinter.com, AskTheCoverDesigner.com, and MagaGenie.com.
73. Index your blog and post a link to the index. See my index at http://www.bookmarket.com/bestofblog.htm.
74. Share content from a book, like this great first line from a novel: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2010/07/great-first-line-for-novel.html. Or these great first lines: http://askthecoverdesigner.com/first-lines-draw-the-reader-in-make-them-great.
75. Share a great line from a TV show or movie. The TV show or movie should be current and hot, a classic, or right on target for your topic. Or simply funny. Funny goes viral.
76. Share a joke. Jokes go viral. Even better if the joke ties into your topic or novel.
77. Create a bibliography for your genre or topic. Feature the best books you recommend.
78. Create a glossary for your genre or topic. Define some of the key terms for romance novels, for science fiction, for rabbit hunting, for crocheting, for what you write about.
79. Share a fact. Give your readers some tidbit they likely don’t know about your topic. This can be a short blog, something like this: Did you know that 1200 years ago there were probably 12 million kiwis in New Zealand. Today there are only 70,000.
80. Let your readers know about your new books, new products, new updates.
81. Blog about new pages you’ve added to your website. Or new websites you’ve created. Here’s the blog post I created to promote the launch of my AskJohnKremer.com website: http://blog.bookmarket.com/2011/04/ask-john-kremer-q-website-check-it-out.html.
82. Congratulate someone. Give them a thumbs up when they publish a new book, launch a new product, do some great service for humanity, have a new baby, get married. You don’t have to tie it into your book or topic.
83. Thank someone publicly. When someone does something especially nice for you, thank them in public via your blog.
84. Make a prediction. Here’s something I tweeted over a year ago that still hasn’t really come true. Alas. – You heard it here first: The economy has begun to turn the corner. People are beginning to trust themselves again. Good times coming again.
85. Raise money for a charity. Offer to donate to a specific charity for every book sold during a specific week or month. Promote this via your blog, tweets, Facebook posts, etc.
86. Ask a provocative question. Encourage people to share their answers in the comments section for that post. Joel Comm once tweeted this question: What would you do if you discovered $100,000 hidden away in your basement? He got 3.5 pages of replies in less than an hour.
87. Solicit help. When Jeff Rivera was fighting gay prejudice in Costa Rica, he asked his Facebook followers and others to write emails to a list of government leaders and thought leaders in Costa Rica. It helped.
88. Celebrate milestones. Blog about your company anniversary, the two-year anniversary of the publication of your book, the 700th post on your blog (coming soon right here).
89. Announce awards and honors. If you receive any awards for your book or honors for yourself, blog about them. Link, of course, to the site of the award giver as well.
90. Excerpt your book. Run a series of excerpts from your book. They can be short paragraphs, tips, entire chapters, a story, whatever you want to share.
91. Ask for feedback on your blog and blog posts. Ask for feedback on your website design.
92. Share personal stories. I tweeted and posted on Facebook when I had a heart attack scare a week ago. Not only did it personalize me for my followers and fans, but it encourage me when I received so many good wishes.
93. Have your dog or cat write a blog post. Chances are, of course, that you’ll have to write the post, but do it in the voice of your pet.
94. Ask your wife, husband, child, mother, father, or favorite aunt to write a guest blog post. The post can be about you, your book, your website, or whatever they want to write about.
95. Invite your friend or neighbor to write a guest blog post. Again, the post can be about you, your book, your website, or whatever they want to write about.
96. Create a scavenger hunt. Ask your readers to find a specific blog post where you wrote about XYZ. Or have them find three specific passages in your book. Or three webpages on your website. This scavenger hunt can be a great tool to encourage people to explore your book, blog, or website in greater depth.
97. Solicit money. If you need to raise funds for the reprinting of your book or to produce a book trailer, create a Kickstarter.com project and promote it through your blog. Better yet, have your child create the project and let them write about it on your blog. Children can be very effective promoters of their parent’s work. And cute.
98. Recruit joint venture partners. When you are working on an Amazon Bestseller Campaign or a BookTourPalooza blog tour, solicit partners via your blog. Write about what you propose to do, and ask your readers if they want to help. You can do solicit JV partners for any promotion campaign.
99. Create a holiday. Anyone can create a new holiday, commemorative week or month, special day of recognition, or related date. You can check out CelebrateToday.com where I feature over 18,500 such special events. Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, and Memorial Day were all days created by individuals or organizations. Take Your Daughter to Work Day was created by the National Organization of Women. What day could you create to promote your book or the topic of your book?
100. Ask for contributions to a new book. I did that for my 4-Minute Momentum series of books (still working on them). Here are some sample 6-word memoirs from the book Six-Word Memoirs on Love & Heartbreak. I bet the authors solicited many of these memoirs via their blog or social networks. – Married by Elvis, divorced by Friday. It’s like my heart has sciatica. It’s worth it, despite your mother. She defines happiness, I defy gravity.
101. Share a mistake. Admit it when you make a mistake. It makes you human. Humans are more fun to read.
102. Create a meme. That’s what Tim Ferriss did in creating his fourhourworkweek.com/blog. Here are a few memes being created on Twitter: Let’s go all the way tonight, no regrets, just spuds… #replacelovewithspud – Come for the funeral, stay for the all meat buffet. #funeralhomeslogans – #mysuperpowerwouldbe Teleportation! NO MORE TRAFFIC! NO MORE WAITING AT THE AIRPORT!
103. Invent a new word, and blog about it. Something like the two words I recently created: booktourpalooza and blogtourpalooza (with accompanying websites soon to come).
1001Ways104. Interview book reviewers.
105. Make a list – like this one. People love lists. And they love to pass them on. Please tweet about this list. And come back to visit again. I’ll be adding more ideas as you pass on your great ideas – and as I come up with more of my own.

People care about novelists and book authors. You don’t have to be perfect. You don’t have to be professorial. You don’t have to be journalistic. Tell the truth. Keep it simple. Cut a vein and let it bleed on the screen.

As noted in this update to the original post, this list can also be used by nonfiction writers. I focused on fiction because fiction writers often ask what they should blog about. Or what they should write articles about. Or what they should do for press releases.

The above ideas, obviously, can be used for more than blogging: article syndication, press releases, new products, newsletter articles, videos, Facebook fan pages, tweets, website content, and much more.

Copyright © 2011 – John Kremer. John Kremer is the author of 1001 Ways to Market Your Books as well as webmaster at http://www.bookmarket.com, http://www.bestsellerlaunchformula.com, and http://www.tenmillioneyeballs.com.

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

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