Authors & Speakers Network Blog with Larry James

Friday, February 28, 2014

The Speaking Pause. . . Why We Won’t Stop Talking!

Filed under: Guest Author Articles,Speaker Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am
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Rich Hopkins, Guest Author

I love the pause… and the pause loves me.

The pause is one of the few friends a speaker can actually take on stage with them, as they face the expectations of their audience. But it is a friend often scorned and forgotten by many as they blow through their presentations like Jimmie Johnson blows through the NASCAR circuit.

pause3Speaking shouldn’t be a race, whether it be a race to fit everything in, or a race to sit down and be safely silent again. Instead, its your opportunity to express yourself, to influence, and inspire to action. If people can’t keep up with you, the chances of anything good coming out of your talk diminishes.

6 Reason We Talk Too Fast

1. We’re subconsciously afraid that we will be interrupted, as if we were talking around the water cooler. If we don’t stop talking, we won’t lose the floor, be forced to answer questions, or, in a sales situation, hear “NO” before we’re ready to handle it.

2. We’re afraid to forget. We think that as long as we know what we’re going to say next, we may as well go for it, so not to allow our mind to go blank.

3. As mentioned above, we have so much to say, we don’t think we have enough time to say it. Check out this post on editing to diagnose and treat this particular issue.

4. We aren’t emotionally connected to what we’re saying. We may be reciting a report or going through a scripted talk we’ve given dozens of times in the past, and our lack of excitement results in non-stop, often monotonal diatribe that leaves the audiences as bored as we are.

5. That’s what we’ve seen. We’ve grown up listening to commercial messages, slick salespeople, even teachers and preachers who pummel us with words at such a high rate of speed we’re more tired than inspired by the time they sit down. If that’s all you know, then that’s what you’ll do. (This concept also explains poor customer service and bad drivers.)

pause6. We just want it to be over, as fast as possible.

What are some of the benefits of using a pause? Are there other causes you can think of for speaking at top speed without time to take a breath? It’s time to examine why we must stop, and find the crucial Silent Seconds in our presentations:

(pause)

1. Connection – pauses allow the audience to see the speaker as a human being, instead of a flapping mouth, perhaps with flapping arms to boot. (pause)They give your audience a chance to catch a glimpse of you in silence, see the look in your eyes, and understand the expressions on your face. Be aware that all of these must aspects of your presentation must be in line with your message. When you pause, take a hurried drink, and sift through a pile of notes, you are no longer in tune with your words, which creates a disconnect.

(pause)

2. Understanding – if you’re discussing new or complicated concepts (communication techniques for husbands, for example), use the pause to let your audience catch up. (pause)Watch your crowd and look for confirming or confused looks. You may need to repeat or clarify, or allow questions to be asked. If you don’t pause to be sure your audience understands, the point of the talk becomes moot.

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(pause)

3. Impact – when you’ve made your most important statements, a pause is a flag that helps the audience identify that fact. (pause)Particularly a pause followed by repeating the statement, followed by another pause. Slowing down the pace to make sure the audience is clear that THIS is what they need to take home with them is worth the effort, and separates the moment from your faster-paced stories and transitions.

(pause)

4. Effective Storytelling – nothing steps on laughter, runs over a dramatic twist, or plain neuters a story like the lack of Silent Seconds. Pausing gives your audience the chance lean forward in their seats and mentally beg for more. Take advantage!

(pause)

When you write your speeches, watch for your Silent Seconds – those times a pause will enhance the connection, understanding and impact of your words. (pause)You’ll find them naturally in your punctuation – when your sentence ends with a period, thats a clue.

(pause)

As I regularly recommend, record yourself, and listen for places your pauses should be, and where they should possibly be longer. (pause)You may fear pausing too long, but typically, the pause in our head is twice as long as the pause the audience observes. (pause) Exercise – try to deliberately pause for 5 seconds. It’ll drive you crazy, as it’ll seem more like 10 as you stand in silence.

(pause)

There are dangers to using pauses as well, but we’ll tackle those later on. For now, take a look at how Silent Seconds will impact your speaking, and impact your audience. Now get out there and remember to Speak (pause) and Deliver!

Copyright © 2014 – Rich Hopkins. Rich offers one-to-one coaching to help you jumpstart your speaking abilities. Whether you are speaking to corporate executives or Cub Scouts, board members or family members, Rich will help you craft your message and delivery to maximize audience interaction and response. Visit Rich’s Website.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
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Thursday, February 20, 2014

A Cure for Writer’s Block

Filed under: Author Tips,Writers Block — Larry James @ 7:30 am
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Linda Stamper Boyne, Guest Author

The human brain is an amazing thing. It has an incredible capacity to figure things out if we just get out of its way.

Example: I’ve had writer’s block. It’s been months since I’ve submitted a column for this publication.

writers-blockI’d sit down to write and, nothing. I’d try writing about some random topic to see if I could get the ball rolling, but the ball stayed motionless. I was a big, black, empty blob. Vast emptiness. N-O-T-H-I-N-G.

“I can’t think of anything to write about. Why can’t I write?” The more I tried, the more frustrated I became. It was a viscious cycle of mental constipation.

So finally I just stopped trying. And it made me sad, to not be doing something I love, something that brings me joy. I missed being able to write.

If running was my thing and I was injured, I could go to physical therapy to get back in shape and out on the trail again. But for writing, I’d need to see a mental therapist, and that’s a whole other Pandora’s box we don’t need to open here.

So I waited.

As May’s snow turned into June’s rain, I did not write. In between July’s thunderstorms and glorious moments of sunshine, I awaited the freedom of inspiration.

Last week, the boys and I flew to Central Oregon to vacation with my family at Sunriver Resort, a mecca of recreation. The resort has 35 miles of bike paths, the Deschutes River winding through, the Cascade Mountains a stone’s throw away, golf courses, tennis courts, swimming pools, stables and shopping. Anything we wish to do, we can do it there. And we did.

I threw myself into playing and family time. Family has a way of refocusing your self-image. I know with some family dynamics, that’s not a good thing, but in my case, it’s for the better.

In the hardcore, athletic community in which I live, I see my self on the very light end of the activity scale. I’m not an adrenaline junky. I’m not outdoorsy. I don’t live to bike or ski or fish. My friends call me their fancy friend.

My mom and sister were surprised by this self-description. To them, I am athletic and adventurous. I think it has to do with context, but I began to see myself through their lens. It re-adjusted my focus and, in some way, set me free. It allowed me to do things I wouldn’t at home.

So, while mountain biking along the Deschutes River south of Bend with the boys, inspiration finally came.

It was more trail riding than mountain biking in Vail Valley terms. The dirt trail rolled gently along the bank of the river with only a few rocks and roots as obstacle. Even on the hills, I never had to shift out of the center ring.

imaginaryFriendsRiding through one section where a lava flow made its way to the river a few years back, there were quite a few rocks poking up in the trail. From somewhere, I heard a voice say, “Focus on where you want to go, not on the obstacles.”

Who was that wise voice inside my head? My dad? The Dalai Lama? Mia from Vail Mountain Bike Camps? I don’t know.

I didn’t hit another rock during that whole section and then it came to me: “Wait a minute! I have been staring at the writer’s block instead of seeing the path around it.”

I wasn’t recognizing the interesting article, the fleeting thought or the funny conversation that usually grows into a column because all I could see was the giant block.

“Hold on! This applies to life as well!”

I’ve been focused on the obstacles in my day-to-day life, the problems, the issues, instead of looking down the path where I want to go. It’s all so clear now!

I couldn’t wait to get back to my computer at the end of the ride. I was suddenly flooded with ideas. I was finally free, my mind no longer locked up, or more accurately, blocked up.

Can you imagine if I started biking all the time? I might be able to find the solution for world peace so beauty queens of all nations could sleep peacefully once more.

BONUS Article: Scribble, Scribble… Write, Write!
Authors: Maintain a “Thought Starter” File
Like Skipping Stones Across the Water…
The 10 Types of Writers’ Block (and How to Overcome Them)

Copyright © 2014 – Linda Stamper Boyne is a free-lance writer and lives in Vail, Colorado.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

The Top 10 Mistakes that New Freelance Writers Make and How to Avoid Them

Alexandra Romanov, Guest Author

There are a number of things that virtually every new freelance writer does that are plain and simple mistakes. I’m here to make your life much easier, by showing you how to avoid the most common mistakes. Why? So you can approach your writing career with confidence, and achieve the success you deserve.

Not working regular hours

freelancerDon’t roll your eyes, I’m not going to tell you that you need to be sitting in front of your computer from 9 to 5, Monday through Friday for 50 weeks a year. What I AM going to tell you is that you need to set regular hours and stick with them.

During whatever hours you set you need to be working on projects or looking for new projects. Period. Sitting at your computer playing Angry Birds does not count. If you don’t have the self-discipline to do this then you need to keep your day job and write as an income supplement.

Working regular hours disciplines your mind and body to work when work is necessary. It also does something else: It makes you QUIT working as well.

Fixing this is actually simple, decide on your working hours and set an alarm on your cell phone. You start and end when the alarm goes off. You don’t have to be militaristic about this; it’s okay to finish the last paragraph or last part of the project you are working on that day.

Working harder than the client expects

This is often a difficult one especially for new writers. You want to do a good job so that the client is happy and gets what they expect. The problem is that if they are paying you $100 and you are putting in $500 worth of work, you lose. It can take a while to get into the groove of meeting client expectations without going so far overboard that you lose money.

Fixing this can be tough for the new writer because you are still learning client expectations. Try and remember that rewrites and edits are part of the game and put in only as much work as the project is actually worth. Don’t do 10 hours of research for a $25 article!

Not paying attention to their hourly rate

Never, ever work for an hourly rate. I hope I have made that absolutely clear. Work by the word or by the project. That said you should always know exactly how much you are making per hour.

$100 for a 500-word article sounds great. But if you have to spend 20 hours researching it and another hour writing it then you are now actually making less than $5 a hour. It doesn’t take long to see a huge problem in your income. You are constantly working and not making any money. In fact, if you work a 42-hour workweek like that you would make $200.

Fixing this is simple. When a client asks you to write something, figure out how much research time is going to be involved before quoting your price. Unless it’s a subject I can write cold, I default to quoting a project rate. If I can write the subject cold I am open to a per word rate.

This will take a little getting used to as a freelance writer so don’t feel bad if you have been guilty of making this mistake in the past. Every freelance writer I know has done this.

Allowing interruptions

This is a big problem for most freelance writers. It’s been such a big problem for me that I could write a book on the subject; or spend the next 30 years in therapy over it. At one point I found out that I was the emergency number for 10 kids at school because their parents worked and I was at home, my husband walking in and talking to me about some mundane thing like laundry and my personal favorite, friend calling to chat during working hours.

Here are a few rules I’ve devised over the years that helped solve this problem:

1. I do have a job, I just work from home. My boss is a tyrant!

2. Unless you are a client, calling or bothering me during business hours is unacceptable and you will be billed for the amount of my time you used (my brother still owes me money on that!)

3. I always have Caller ID activated

4. Treat your freelance writing career the same as you would if you were working from a company office.

To be completely honest here, I gave the information about my working hours to my friends and the interruptions stopped immediately. My husband and brother…not so much.

If you want to make a success of freelance writing then you have to focus on work during working hours. That means eliminating as many interruptions and distractions as possible. If you were working a traditional job then these distractions wouldn’t be allowed and no one would expect you tolerate them. Your boss certainly wouldn’t allow them to go on if your productivity suffered.

dog-on-computer-300x300Avoiding Social Media

Why so many writers avoid social media is beyond me. I suppose it’s because many writers were raised that self-promotion is a bad thing. We were raised by a generation that believed it was in poor taste to “toot your own horn” well those rules have changed slightly with the invention of the Internet. It’s no longer seen as crass to promote yourself as long as it’s part of a legitimate business. In the case of being a freelance writer, learning to navigate social media can be the difference between obscurity and financial success.

Start by setting up LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter accounts. Make sure that you have the accounts set up to sync, that is tell each other when you have posted to one of the accounts. In this way you can make a single post on Facebook and have it also show up on Twitter and LinkedIn. Be sure to engage your readers on these accounts as well. If you write for blogs or other online media that has a comments section, respond to comments posted by readers. The more you respond and interact with the various social media platforms the more comfortable you will become with them and the faster your business will grow.

Not creating and maintaining a website

This is a huge mistake that many beginning freelance writers make. The cause behind it seems to be that if no one knows you then you don’t need a website. The problem with that is that most potential clients expect you to have one and will go looking for it. When you don’t have one you look unprofessional and the potential clients move on to the next freelance writer on the list.

This is a super easy fix. You get a website with your own domain name or that of your freelance writing business. You create a professional looking site and keep it updated. It’s simple to set up, easy to maintain and will show potential clients who you are and why they should hire you.

Working for horrible clients

This is seriously one of the stupidest things anyone who works as a freelancer ever does. It’s devastating to your emotional and physical health and it will make you burn out faster than anything. Fire these people immediately.

I’m a big fan of Timothy Ferriss and his book The 4-hour Workweek. In it he points out the 80-20 rule. This is an interesting economic theory that long ago proved that 80% of the people cause most of the problems while 20% create most of your profits. It is rare if not unheard of that these are the same people. You need to figure out which 20% are the most profitable and attempt to replicate those clients while eliminating the 80% who are difficult.

In addition, stand up for yourself. If you have an insulting and abusive client, call them on it in a polite and professional manner. Let them know that you will no longer tolerate the abuse and that if they can’t behave in a professional manner then they need to find someone else.

Never accept abuse from anyone. There is no amount of money worth your mental health and that is what these people are taking from you.

Not setting up an accounting system

You need this for tax purposes on the whole. Eventually the government is going to want their share of your income. I strongly recommend hiring an accountant. Beyond that a simple accounting system that tracks your income v/s your expenses is usually enough. Keep every receipt for your business.

Beyond the tax issue, without an accounting system in place you have no idea where you and your business are in the grand scheme of things. You need to be able to plan both short and long term and without an idea of where your money is coming from and where it’s going the process is much harder.

In the US, consider taking a small business accounting class at a community college. These courses are often offered through adult continuing education for a small fee. Normally a class like this will meet one evening a week for 6-8 weeks. You don’t get a certificate or degree and the classes are not for credit. What you get is the information you need to have a better handle on the financial side of your business.

Not setting business goals

You don’t have to set up a full business plan but you should have yearly, quarterly and even monthly goals. They can be goals pertaining to earnings, publications or numbers of new clients. It’s always good to jot these down and assess yourself every now and then. Consider it a performance review of yourself. Without goals you will find yourself working without purpose, as in just earning money for the sake of earning money. Hard as it is to believe, that is perhaps the worst reason to work. If you want to grow your business, you need to set realistic goals and work towards meeting them.

Becoming a Workaholic

This is the single most devastating thing that a new writer can do to their freelance writing career. Nothing will speed you on your way to burnout faster and nothing will destroy the foundation of your business faster than overwork. It’s also totally pointless.

You cannot work 20 hours a day for a long period of time without burning out, not in this business. The primary function of sleep is to refresh and recharge the brain. Without enough sleep your writing will suffer.

Building a freelance writing career takes time but it’s not like I can tell you to spend 200 hours on it and presto you will be a success as soon as you the 200th hour. The time it takes can’t be rushed because you are only half of the equation. Take your time and build at a steady rate. The foundation of your business will be stronger. Spend your time building a client list of great clients and weeding out the bad ones. Spend time marketing your business and using social media to get your brand in front of an audience. These are the things that build successful freelance careers. Then when your normal working day is finished, stop and enjoy life. Leave work at work. If you are always working, at least in your head, you will exhaust yourself and bore friends and family to tears.

Copyright © 2014 – Alexandra Romanov. Alexandra started writing for Freedom With Writing in January, 2013. She is a freelance writer based in St. Louis Missouri. She’s been freelance writing for web publications since the early 90′s, and has written for a wide variety of websites, including Wired, Yahoo Finance, and USA Today. Visit her Website.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

3 Ways to Promote Yourself As A Writer (Even When You Don’t Want To)

Emily Harstone, Guest Author

“Writing is something you do alone. Its a profession for introverts who want to tell you a story but don’t want to make eye contact while doing it.” ~ John Green

As an introvert, a writer, and a very reluctant self-promoter, this quote has always struck me as being particularly profound. Not just because of what it says, but because of who said it. John Green is a bestselling Young Adult novelist as well as a video blogger watched by millions of people every week. He is also very clearly an introvert. Having met him once at a reading before he was as famous as he is now, I was struck by how uncomfortable he looked interacting with everyone, yet even that discomfort came across as charming.

shyAuthor3He had found a way through YouTube to connect with people. He created a fanbase with his brother, and they used it to promote books and various other projects that had a positive impact on the world. In short John Green did not have to stop being an introvert to promote his books, and he never had to become heavy handed about it either.

As a writer, one has to find unusual ways to promote oneself without feeling like you have to force it down someone’s throat. Some authors are naturally self-promotional and they understand and know how to promote themselves in a positive way. I am in awe of authors like this, but I definitely do not have their talent. Below are three ways that a reluctant self-promoter (like myself) can support their work.

1. Start A Blog (or a Vlog, or a Tumblr) ~ Most writers have blogs so this might be obvious, but what I am suggesting is not to start a blog directly about yourself or your writing, but about something else. Perhaps your blog can be devoted to favorite quotations, or the best literary journals, or even pictures that remind you of books; it could be anything.

Tumblr, a micro blogging site, is particularly full of blogs with a very specific focus. There is even a blog there devoted to women poets wearing sweatpants. You can also start a video blog about things you care about, book reviews for example, or short biographies of your favorite authors. Readers are more likely to stumble across your work through search engines and links, and you will probably reach a lot of readers who don’t know you in person.

selfpromotecartoon2. Use Your Facebook Page ~ Now a lot of people these days suggest starting an authors facebook page to promote your literary work. I definitely think that you should do that, but you can also use your personal page to your advantage. On my personal page I never talk about anything too personal: most of what I write about and post are pictures of my dog, the rural area where we live, and good books I have read. But because I have over 400 friends, many of whom I am barely in touch with, I get a lot of responses to what I post.

So I try to shuffle in talk about writing, links to my poems published in literary journals, and things like that fairly often. Often those links get shared by other people, and so my readership broadens. My work has also been solicited by editors who are friends, or friends on facebook. It really helps my career to be on there.

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3. Have A Beautiful Business Card ~ I bump into people who want to read my work all the time. Sometimes it will come up in a coffee shop, or at the gym, or, well, volunteering. However, even though I have a website that is easy to Google, I know most people won’t take that step without a reminder.

That is why I have a businesses card. It doesn’t mention my other profession as a professor, it just has my name, my website, my email address, and the word poet. My business card has all that information, and on the other side is a beautiful picture of a willow tree. Everyone comments on the picture. It is important to have some sort of visual image, because that encourages the individual that receives the card to save the card; it isn’t just another scrap of paper. I made my cards at moo.com, but I am sure there are many other good options.

BONUS Articles: 46 Top Websites to Promote Your Book for FREE
The Buzz on Being a Shameless NetShaker! ~ Part One

Copyright © 2014 – Emily Harstone. Emily Harstone is a frequent contributor to www.AuthorsPublish.com.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

commentNOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

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