Authors & Speakers Network Blog with Larry James

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Giving a Speech? Let Others Do Some of the Talking

Filed under: Speaker Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am

Be an interactive speaker!

Keep the communicative theme between you and your audience going and consider asking questions directly to the audience. Not only will asking questions to the crowd get you some active participants, but it will help ease any nerves you have by sharing the spotlight. Asking your audience a question can be an effective attention getter at the beginning of your speech.

giving-a-speechI often will surprise the audience by giving the first person to answer one of my questions one of my books! Sometimes I tell them in advance, but most of the time I surprise them with a signed copy. After that, the audience will begin to warm up and will have some questions of their own. Make time for a question and answer time “during” your talk, not just at the end of your talk. This will help you adapt your message more specifically to your audience. They get to hear what they want to hear.

You can set expectations early on about whether you will take questions during the presentation, or whether you will set aside specific times to handle questions. Depending on the audience, I will almost always let them know that it is okay to ask questions during my talk. I always thank them for the question and repeat in my own words what I believe I have been asked. Sometimes not everybody in the audience will have heard the question. This gives you two advantages: 1. It clarifies that you have understood the question and, 2. It gives you a little time to reflect before answering.

If your audience is indeed loosened up enough to ask questions, before I answer, I might say, “That’s a great question. What good ideas do you have?” to begin the interaction.

Obviously you must know your material very well to be unafraid to have an unexpected question throw you off topic. A good speaker will anticipate questions and be prepared to give answers during those sometimes awkward moments.

If your entire speech is a series of statements, your audience may passively listen and absorb very little. On the other hand, you can make them active participants by inviting them to “think” about your key points. This is most effective if they are asked to think about an issue from a fresh perspective. Allowing the audience to “ask” questions during your talk is a great way to clarify and reinforce your message. It’s an important way for listeners to clarify and get more information from the speaker. Of course, this will depend upon whether you are delivering a keynote address or are talking to a small group which may be less formal and more conducive for this format.

Your listeners will often sit and quietly be thinking of a question they might like to ask but are to shy to speak up. If you’ve giving the talk many times before, you will most likely know the questions they might like to ask. Rather than waiting to address these questions following your speech (e.g. in a Q and A session), address them in the body of your speech by asking the question and immediately answering it.

If time allows for it, consider preparing a role-play scenario that, through audience participation, could exemplify one of your key points in your talk in real-time.

Asking, “Are there any questions?” at the end of your talk is not what it’s cracked up to be. Lisa B. Marshall, professional speaker says, “I think many speakers say these things because they’ve finished speaking and then suddenly realize that their audience hasn’t realized they’re done! So, in desperation, they blurt out one of these phrases, hopeful that those words will clue them in.”

There is this long pause… because no one asks a question. Then, what do you do? Some make a lame comment like, “Guess I covered everything quite well.” That’s dumb.

Always include enough time to fully summarize your main points. Remember, “repetition” is an important part of learning and also for comprehension and recall.

Give up saying, “Thank you,” at the end of your talk. They should be thanking you! It’s better to just stop talking.

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Copyright © 2013 – Larry James. Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

commentSubscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
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Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Fifteen Things the Media Loves

Rick Frishman, Guest Author

1. News – News is not just about information, it’s about communicating value and benefit for their audience.

2. Brevity – State what you’re pitching and how it will help their audience in a short, concise message.

15Things3. Knowing Targets– Research the audience you want to reach and the media that reaches that audience. Then customize your pitch to the outlet you are pitching.

4. Relationships – Build a relationship rather than try to sell a particular story.

5. Preparation – Do your homework and be ready to deliver what the media needs. Have materials to send.

6. Broad Appeal – Create stories that reach a wide variety of individuals with broad themes.

7. Ties – Try to tie your story into a larger news event – if it makes sense to do so.

8. Experience – The media likes to know that other media is paying attention to you so send articles and tape.

9. Visualization – Use visual terms to create graphic images and colorful anecdotes to illustrate your point.

10. Celebrity Tie-Ins – Products linked to celebrities usually get more ink and air time. Is what you’re speaking about something you can link to a celebrity? If so, bring it up to the media.

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Click for info!

11. Prompt Response – Time is of the essence, especially to reporters on deadline. Send what the reporter needs as quickly as possible.

12. Courtesy – Be polite and respectful to everyone, receptionists included. Learn how to pronounce a reporters name before you speak with them.

13. Visual Aids – Send charts, graphs, and photographs that a reporter can use to quickly illustrate your merit to an editor.

14. No Road Blocks – Smooth the way and remove all obstacles that could derail or weaken your story.

15. A Pleasant Attitude – Be pleasant, enthusiastic and professional. See yourself as a valuable resource and become someone the media enjoys associating with.

An excerpt from the National Best-Seller, “GUERRILLA PUBLICITY: Hundreds of Sure-fire Tactics to Get Maximum Sales for Minimum Dollars” by Rick Frishman, Jill Lublin and Jay Conrad Levinson.

rick_photoCopyright © 2013 – Rick Frishman. – Reprinted with permission. Rick Frishman, the founder of Planned Television Arts, has been one of the leading book publicists in America for over 30 years. He has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and more than a dozen TV shows nationwide including OPRAH and Bloomberg TV. – www.rickfrishman.com.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Speaking in Public: Two Errors That Lead to Fear

Filed under: Speaker Tips — Larry James @ 7:30 am
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Seth Godin, Guest Author

1. You believe that you are being actively judged

2. You believe that the subject of the talk is you

When you stand up to give a speech, there’s a temptation to believe that the audience is actually interested in you.

SpeakingFEARThis just isn’t true. (Or if it is, it doesn’t benefit you to think that it is).

You are not being judged, the value of what you are bringing to the audience is being judged. The topic of the talk isn’t you, the topic of the talk is the audience, and specifically, how they can use your experience and knowledge to achieve their objectives.

When a professional singer sings a song of heartbreak, his heart is not breaking in that moment. His performance is for you, not for him. (The infinite self-reference loop here is that the professional singer finds what he needs when you find what you need.)

The members of the audience are interested in themselves. The audience wants to know what they can use, what they can learn, or at the very least, how they can be entertained.

If you dive into your (irrelevant to the listener) personal hurdles, if you try to justify what you’ve done, if you find yourself aswirl in a whirlpool of the resistance, all you’re providing is a little schadenfreude – pleasure derived by someone from another person’s misfortune – as a form of entertainment.

On the other hand, if you realize that you have a chance to be generous in this moment, to teach and to lead, you can leave the self-doubt behind and speak a truth that the audience needs to hear. When you bring that to people who need it, your fear pales in comparison.

Media you choose to do is always about the audience. That’s why you’re doing it. The faster we get over ourselves, the sooner we can do a good job for those tuning in.

Copyright © 2013. Seth Godin. Seth Godin has written thirteen books that have been translated into more than thirty languages. Every one has been a bestseller. He writes about the post-industrial revolution, the way ideas spread, marketing, quitting, leadership and most of all, changing everything. Seth is the founder of The Domino Project. Check Seth’s Blog.

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Larry James is a Professional Speaker, Author and Coach. Larry James presents networking seminars nationally and offers Networking coaching; one-on-one or for your Networking Group! Invite Larry James to speak to your group! His latest book is, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Something NEW about Networking is posted on this Networking BLOG every 4th day! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
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Monday, December 2, 2013

10 Ways to Promote Your Book in Your Own Backyard

Dana Lynn Smith, Guest Author

Online marketing is a wonderful way to reach a worldwide audience, but sometimes authors overlook book marketing opportunities in their own backyard. In your local area and region, you have the opportunity to stand out as a bigger fish in a smaller pond. Here are ten tips for promoting locally:

book-promotion1. Always carry books and literature with you. Keep a case of books and some flyers in the trunk of your car, and business cards in your wallet. You never know when you will run across a potential customer or marketing contact.

2. Look for opportunities across your area. Headed out for a weekend getaway or off to visit grandma? Do a little research ahead of time to identify bookstores, retailers and libraries in the area that you can call on. Or plan your own book tour, staying with friends and relatives along the way.

3. Promote yourself as a “local author” to bookstores and libraries. Many bookstores and libraries have a special section where they showcase the books of local or regional authors.

4. Look for other retailers that are a good fit. Think about what type of retailers relate to the topic of your book, and promote yourself as a local author.

5. Put “local author” stickers on the books that you sell in your area.

6. Speak at libraries. Contact libraries about doing a presentation on your book’s topic. This can be especially effective for children’s books and for nonfiction titles that have a broad appeal (such as travel, business, or fitness). Many libraries will let you sell your books at your presentation, and some have a budget for paying speakers.

7. Find other speaking opportunities. Speaking is a great way to sell books, and you may even get paid to speak once you get some experience. There are lots of organizations looking for interesting speakers for their meetings, including business and civic organizations, church groups, schools and universities, trade associations, and more.

8. Seek publicity through local and regional media. Send a book announcement press release to media in the town where you grew up and where you live now. The “local girl makes good” angle works especially well in smaller towns. Create press releases based on local tie-ins, such as a novel set in the region, and on current news events. Don’t forget your college alumni newsletter and any civic or professional associations you belong to. Nonfiction authors should consider radio and television talk shows.

9. Exhibit at book fairs and festivals. These usually work best if your book is related to the theme of the event, or if the book has appeal to a broad audience.

10. Market children’s book through schools and youth organizations. School visits are a great way to reach kids. For tips, see this article by Melissa Williams.

DanaSmithCopyright © 2011 – Dana Lynn Smith. Dana is a book marketing coach and author of the Savvy Book Marketer Guides. For more book marketing tips, follow BookMarketer on Twitter and get Dana’s free Top Book Marketing Tips ebook when you visit her book marketing BLOG.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

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