Authors & Speakers Network Blog with Larry James

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

How Talking to the Media is Like Giving a Speech And… How It’s Not!

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

I recently traveled to Toronto to speak at a conference for business and professional women. It was an exciting event with women from varied backgrounds speaking on a range of topics designed to inspire and empower the attendees.

In preparing my talking points, I thought long and hard about which elements of my knowledge and experience would most benefit this audience. What did I want them to take away from their 45 minutes with me?

mediaIn that regard, preparing for a speech is in many ways like preparing for a radio, TV or print interview, or developing content for social media. You need to know your audience, and you need to think about what they’ll take away from listening to (or reading) what you have to say. Those take-aways should be information that holds a lot of value – not for you, but for them.

There are also a number of differences between a speech delivered directly to your audience, and talking to your audience via the media. Some, of course, are obvious. But others may not have occurred to you.

Here are a few:

For TV and radio:

Less time equals fewer “bullet points”: Occasionally, you’ll get a 30-minute or even an hour-long interview, but more often, you’ll have just a few minutes to make your points. So keep it simple! What two to three take-aways will reflect your message and benefit your listeners?

I talk to many people who have a difficult time distilling their “story” into seconds-long sound bites. If you’re like them, banish the “story” idea entirely. Instead, ask yourself, “Why is my message so important to me?” The answer to that is usually, “Because I know it can help solve a problem for others.” Now, tease out two to three points that can at least begin to help people solve that problem.

An interview is a conversation: Unlike speaking directly to an audience, when you’re talking via a talk show host it’s important to focus on engaging him or her. Do that, and you’ll engage the audience. For radio, have your take-always written down and placed where you can see them, just in case. (You won’t have that option for TV.) If the host asks a question that steers the conversation away from the points you want to make, answer it, but then steer the interview back to your message.

Remember, your interview may be edited: If your interview is not aired live, there are any number of reasons why portions might be edited out. Most of the time it’s because they’re dissatisfied with the interview. Keeping your take-aways pointed and succinct can help prevent that.

For print:

newspaperreporterYour words will be filtered by a reporter: If you’re being interviewed by print journalists, they’re likely taking notes by hand or recording the interview for transcribing later. Either way, what appears in print is subject to the reporter’s understanding and interpretation of what you’ve said. To help prevent a miscommunication, have your take-aways written down so you can be very clear and allow no room for misunderstanding. If the reporter does not have a specialty beat related to your expertise or is with a mainstream publication, as opposed to a trade, avoid using a lot of technical terms and jargon.

Social Media:

Can you share a take-away in 140 characters or less?: The beauty of social media is that you’re in control; the challenge is that you must be self-disciplined about the length of what you write. Twitter limits each post to 140 characters. One study of Facebook found that posts with 0 to 140 characters got far more responses than those with 141 and more. Another study found posts of 100 to 250 characters (about three lines) got 60 percent more response than those with more than 250. Be succinct. If you want to share lengthy material, post a link.

One thing holds true whether you’re giving a talk, an interview or posting on social media: Overtly promoting yourself, your product, company or book is not content that audiences value. They have ads and commercials – often entertaining, multi-million-dollar productions – for that.

Establishing yourself as an expert in your field sets you apart from your competition, which is why publicity is so important to building your brand.

The goal is not to sell, but to share your special knowledge in ways that will benefit your audience. In return, you gain their respect, trust, gratitude, and eventually, their patronage.

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2013 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
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Monday, April 22, 2013

5 Tips for Being a Great On-Air Guest

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Being in a business that works closely with all of the mass media, I keep tabs on the industry trends. It’s been interesting to watch some of the traditional media, notably hard-copy print, slide as on-line media roars ahead.

OnAirEven more interesting, however, has been seeing how tenaciously radio – talk radio in particular – continues to hold listeners. That’s valuable information for anyone interested in promoting themselves or their business, product or book.

More than 4,000 stations carry news, talk or personality shows and their themes run the gamut, everything from health to consumer news to the paranormal. That news/talk format ranks second only to country music in popularity, so whether your message appeals to a broad audience or a niche group, you’ll likely find them on radio.

Here are a few more updates on talk radio from a report published just last month – the Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2013:

• 92 percent of Americans ages 12 and older own a radio or listen at least once a week.
• A third of adults listened to news radio “yesterday.”
• SiriusXM had a record 23.9 million subscribers in 2012.
• 34 percent of Americans listen to streaming AM/FM radio online or Internet-only radio.
• 69 percent of listeners say they “like” or “love” broadcast radio; 75 percent say the same for satellite radio.

That last number makes talk radio an especially powerful medium for people who have a message to spread: Listeners tune in because they’re fans – they want to hear what their favorite host has to say! So guess what? If you’re a guest, they’re listening to that host’s entire interview with you. And you automatically get a bump in credibility: If their favorite host has you on his show, he must think you’ve got something valuable to say.

talkRadioTo ensure those listeners come away agreeing, here are a few tips for being a great guest on talk radio:

Answer questions directly: It’s never a good idea to tap dance around an answer! If you don’t like the question, answer it in a way that steers the conversation back to your message. Hosts don’t have time for tap dancing, so evading questions will mean a quick end to your interview.

Mimic the host: Pay attention to his or her changing tempo and cadence and get in sync with it. Is he slowing down and getting thoughtful? Speeding up to sneak in a few more words before a commercial? Whatever he or she does, take the cue and do the same. It will sound like you and the host have a great rapport, which makes listening more entertaining.

Limit your use of numbers and statistics: If you have one special stat that really drives home your point, use it, but otherwise, avoid numbers – they’re verbal sleeping pills. As you prepare for your interview, look for more entertaining ways to describe what you illustrated with numbers in written materials.

Don’t try too hard: It’s obvious when someone is trying to impress; they over-think, talk too much, and say too little. Relax, stick to select bullet points (don’t try to share everything you know in one interview!) and let your message flow.

Compliment the host: Radio hosts tend to have healthy egos and even those who don’t will appreciate a kind word. Avoid fawning or exaggerating, which comes off as insincere and trying too hard. Rather, you might respond to a question with, “Good question!” or mention how much you enjoy the show. Frequently addressing the host by his or her first name is another subtle form of flattery – a person’s name is the most important word in the world to them. Remembering it and using it are nice ways to show recognition and respect. If you’re responding to callers, use their first names as well.

Talk radio is so much more convenient and less time-consuming than other forms of mass media, and nowadays, your interview can stick around for a good long time. Radio stations often post recordings of shows on their websites, so you can post a link to your interview from your own website and share links on social media. Better yet, get your own copy of the recording to use and share so you’ll always have it.

With every interview, you’ll build credibility and visibility. By posting it on your website, you’ll show visitors that you’re a go-to source for the media. I can’t think of a better way to set yourself apart from your competition.

BONUS Article: Radio Talk Shows
Radio Talk Show Tip
Speak in Soundbites on Radio Talk Shows!
Radio Station Checklist: “Stuff” You NEED to Know & Do BEFORE You Go on the Air!
FREE 25-page eBOOK – “How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest!”

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2013 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Saturday, April 6, 2013

Don’t Pay for Radio Interviews!

Joan Stewart, Guest Author

It used to be that all you had to do was pitch a great idea with a clever hook, and you’d be booked as a guest on a half-hour radio show.

These days, however, hang onto your wallet. A new breed of radio host is insisting that guests fork over a few hundred dollars-sometimes more-for the “privilege” of being on their show. Some guests, desperate for exposure for a new book or project, willingly pay the money. Then they’re disappointed when they get little feedback from listeners, or the show leads to no product sales.

There’s nothing wrong with the concept of paying money for air time. But there’s a name for it. It’s called advertising. Joe Sabah, author of the book “How to Get on Radio Talk Shows All Across America Without Leaving Home,” says that if you want a legitimate interview, no money should change hands.

“With more than 740 radio shows all over the country willing to book guests for free, there’s absolutely no reason why anybody should have to pay,” Sabah said.

A different twist on the same theme involves a radio station approaching someone and offering them their own weekly show on a particular topic, then telling them they must charge guests to appear. That means that if a host comes across someone who they think would be a great guest, they can’t book them if the guest can’t afford to pay.

Why, suddenly, are some radio interviews no longer free?

The radio industry has been going through sweeping changes in the last several years, with many stations being bought or sold for hefty amounts, and that means they’re trying to entice people like you into paying the freight.

Joann McCall has an interesting perspective on the problem. As president of McCall Public Relations in Portand, Oregon, she specializes in generating publicity for authors. She also has been a radio host, interviewer and newscaster for 18 years and hosts a radio show with her partner, Debb Janes, called “Janes McCall & Co.,” on KKSN radio in Portland.

McCall says the practice of charging guests has become acceptable – even though it isn’t right.

“Having someone approach you to pay for an interview is like buying a radio infomercial,” she said.

McCall was once approached by an unsuspecting “programmer” who said he worked for a network of stations and offered to give her client a radio show for $5,000 a month. As soon as advertisers were attracted to the show and paid for commercial time, there would be no charge.

“I told him he had to be kidding,” she said. “As soon as the programmer figured out I knew the business, he backed way down.”

Turns out his “network” consisted of only two stations.

McCall advises that guests don’t pay. Instead, when you hear a sales pitch, simply reply, “Pay for an interview? I don’t need to. Thanks anyway.”

If you choose to do it, McCall advises, make sure you know what kind of results you are likely to get. Have the “programmer” (i.e. sales person) give you names and phone numbers of others who have bought air time. Then call those people and ask them about their experiences on the show. Ask how much money they made in product sales, how many phone calls they got from listeners if it was a call-in show, and whether they would do it again for the same amount of money.

McCall cautions that aggressive, pay-for-interview “hosts” will probably be on the upswing because there are more low-powered FM stations on the horizon.

“Don’t be bullied by these people,” she said.

BONUS Articles: Radio Station Checklist
How to Be a Great Radio Guest!

Copyright © 2013 – Joan Stewart, Speaker/Trainer/Consultant – Reprinted with permission. Joan Stewart shows you how to use the media to establish your credibility, enhance your reputation, sell more products and services, promote a favorite cause or issue and position yourself as an employer of choice. – Subscribe to: “The Publicity Hound’s Tips of the Week,” a free e-zine delivered every Tuesday. www.PublicityHound.com.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

What’s the Good of Talk Radio Appearances if I Can’t Pitch My Product?

Filed under: Promotion,Radio Talk Show Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am
Tags: , , ,

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Here’s how to be a great talk show guest and how you’ll benefit. Sometimes people are surprised – OK, dumbfounded – when I explain that they shouldn’t pitch their product during their radio talk show interview.

“What?” they say. “Isn’t that why I’m on the show??”

Actually, no.

Radio-Talk-Show11Show hosts don’t want to sell your book, product, or services. They want to provide information and entertainment that keep their listeners tuned in and paying attention. If you get on a show and pitch what you’ve got to sell, you’re a commercial – not entertainment. And that’s the fastest way to get your interview cut short or killed entirely.

So what’s in it for you?

Being interviewed on a talk show:

1. Positions you as an expert in your field.
2. Gains you (and your product/company/book) the implied endorsement of mainstream media.
3. Puts your name and the name of whatever you’re selling in front of a large audience.

In return, you give a great interview with useful information, educated opinions and entertaining anecdotes shared with friendly enthusiasm. That way, the talk show hosts keep their listeners tuned in, which helps them sell all those commercial spots – you know, the ones people tune out.

The best way to ensure you have a successful interview is to forget you’ve got something to sell and work your marketing efforts around the goal of being the perfect radio guest. How?

Don’t position yourself as an author or executive. Instead, position yourself as an expert on your topic or your industry. Sell only your depth of knowledge and your ability to help answer key questions about some aspect of your topic that may have been in the news recently. For instance, a realtor can talk about escaping foreclosures. A stockbroker can talk about how to manage your own portfolio. Experts on just about any topic can look to the newspaper and find stories related to their expertise. Find that news story and shape your media pitch around it, and include the fact that you have expertise in the field.

Engage the host. The host is your most important audience. People are usually fans of particular shows because they’re interested in what he has to say, so if you can engage him, you will engage his audience. Talk candidly and openly about your topic in relationship to the current events surrounding it. Make sure your advice is honest as well as conversational, and try to be as natural as possible. Listeners will be able to sense whether your interview is genuine. But don’t worry about entertaining them; entertain the host.

Don’t sell. Stay on topic during the interview, and when appropriate, mention the free material on your website that could benefit the host’s listeners. If you engage the host, give a great interview and offer helpful information, you don’t have to worry about selling anything. The host will do it for you. He’ll make sure his audience knows you’re an expert, he’ll share your website’s address, he’ll mention the name of your book or he’ll talk about the value of your product. He’ll do the promotion for you.

Have a website that does more than sell your product. If you are an author, provide free “tips articles” that explain your topic or your viewpoint in an informational manner. If you’re selling a product, create free reports or articles for your site that lay out the problem your product solves, again, in an educational tone.

With your great interview, you can drive radio listeners to your website in a non-commercial way that doesn’t make you sound like a carnival barker. The host appreciates you not sounding like an infomercial and urges his loyal audience to visit your site. If you’re really good, the host may even ask you back again.

And you achieved all this simply by resisting the instinct to “sell,” and focusing your efforts on helping the radio host offer listeners a good show!

BONUS Article: Radio Talk Shows
Radio Talk Show Tip
Speak in Soundbites on Radio Talk Shows!
Radio Station Checklist: “Stuff” You NEED to Know & Do BEFORE You Go on the Air!
FREE 25-page eBOOK – “How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest!”

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2012 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity. Outside of the office, she is also the founder of a non-profit organization called the Cherish the Children Foundation. In 1996 the White House recognized her charity which sets out to raise awareness of the plight of underprivileged and foster children. Visit Marsha’s Website!

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Friday, January 6, 2012

How Small Is Too Small?

Filed under: Guest Author Articles,Radio Talk Show Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am
Tags:

Marsha Friedman, Guest Author

Why Small Radio Station Interviews Can Be Just As Good – If Not Better – Than the Big Ones!

There is no question that the activity of public relations is primarily a numbers game.

OntheairThe predominant viewpoint is that a campaign that reaches a large audience is typically a successful campaign. But when you delve beyond the surface, you may be surprised to discover that there are still instances in which smaller can actually be better.

In radio, that is very much the case these days.

So much has changed in the world of talk radio, where the power of the station isn’t as relevant as it used to be, primarily because of three key elements: ratings, formats and the Internet.

Big radio stations in big markets are more and more being ruled by Arbitron ratings, which can now track audiences in increments of about 3 minutes. This phenomenon is making the days of 10- and 20-minute interviews in many major markets a thing of the past. They do still take place, but in fewer and fewer places. However, stations in smaller markets tend not to be as slavish to these format structures, enabling their hosts to conduct more substantive interviews.

As it stands now, in the bigger markets many shows schedule 5- to 7-minute interviews. And, some are starting to do even shorter interviews, 3.5- to 5-minute interviews, which is the same format as the guest interview segments on TV. We’re seeing that more and more in the major markets.

That’s where smaller stations in smaller markets can be a great fit, because a small station with a smaller, but more loyal, audience can really deliver the goods. They can afford to have a guest on for 10, 20 and sometimes 30 minutes, and the audience will be more attentive and responsive listening to guests they like.

In addition, while the majority of big-market stations and nationally syndicated shows have phased out listener call-in segments, many smaller market shows still have listeners calling in. And that’s where a guest on a roll, who can grab the interest and attention of the listeners, can have a segment last way beyond the original length of the scheduled interview.

radiointerviewSo, while the idea of appearing on shows on big stations in big markets still stands as a primary guideline in PR, there are places on the radio dial where big doesn’t necessarily mean better. Sometimes, there is nothing better than a small, dedicated audience who listens to a long-time, well-loved local broadcaster. If you ignore those opportunities, you could be missing out on some premium media interviews.

Lastly, it’s critical to understand how effective the Internet has become in extending the audience reach of stations and markets, both big and small. Today, in order for any radio station to be competitive, they have to have a strong Internet presence and simulcast their shows online. As well, today most hosts are blogging to build and maintain their audience numbers, and when they have a good show, they’ll create a podcast of it. Hosts are not only promoting your appearance on their show, but if you’re a good guest, they promote it through all their social networks, their blogs and podcasts.

Why does all this matter? Because the whole reason you do radio is for the quality of communication. This is why many people still prefer picking up their phone and calling someone instead of emailing them or texting them. It’s why we still have face-to-face meetings with our business associates and clients. It’s why we do conference calls. And it’s also why we call our relatives to wish them a happy birthday instead of just tweeting them. It’s about the quality of that communication. The sound of a human voice can communicate passion, intent, emotion and sincerity. Can you imagine what history would have been like if FDR had written his “we have nothing to fear but fear itself” speech as an op-ed in The Washington Post as opposed to having given it as a radio address? Could Orson Welles’ “War of the Worlds” have scared as many people if it was a short story instead of a radio play?

We do radio to provide a greater quality of communication to our audiences. So, you can play the numbers game if you wish, but if you do, you’ll miss the whole point of doing radio in the first place and the ghost of Marconi may well come and haunt you for it.

“A small but dedicated audience can be even more valuable than an audience that’s five times as big but more likely to channel surf. Because of PPM (Personal People Meter, the ratings system that tracks listeners minute-to-minute) and the corporate structure of radio now, major markets are overrated. Trust me. I have many contemporaries in radio who know they were able to do a better show and conduct longer interviews in a smaller market because the ratings system is different. So, as a guest, you’re going to get more time to share your message and it’s going to be with a much more dedicated audience, since listeners have fewer talk shows to choose from.” ~ Alex Hinojosa, former full-time radio personality and current Senior Campaign Manager at EMSI

Larry’s NOTE: Receive a copy of my 25-page eBOOK, “How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest!” The best part? It’s FREEEEEE! There is nothing to buy now – or ever. This isn’t some teaser offer where you only get to see what’s listed and then have to buy something in order to get the goods. This is completely 100% free to you. It’s my way of “giving back!” If you would like a free copy, pay for it with a Tweet. Click here for info on how to get it!

BONUS Articles: Radio Interviews 101
Radio Interviews 101 – Controversy
How NOT to Be a Good Guest!

Marsha-with-Signature Copyright 2012 by Marsha Friedman. Reprinted with permission. Marsha Friedman is Chief Executive Officer of EMSI Public Relations, a company that has been used for more many years as a source for guests, topics and experts on talk radio programs across the country. It regularly schedules up to 80 interviews per week. For more information visit Marsha’s Website at: www.Event-Management.com.

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Authors & Speakers Network Blog

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Preparing for Your First Interview as a Published Author

Filed under: Author Tips,Guest Author Articles,Radio Talk Show Tips — Larry James @ 9:00 am
Tags:

Roger C. Parker, Guest Author

Preparing for your first interview as a published, or self-published, author is an important step in promoting your book and building your personal brand. It’s an event worth preparing for.

radio-mikeWhen you prepare for your first interview, you’re also making an investment in your long-term personal branding success. As your online visibility and your personal brand grows, it’s likely that you’ll be contacted for more and more interviews.

Preparation is the key to successful interviews; preparation reduces stress and puts you in charge, making it easy to sell your book and communicate your personal branding message.

It’s never too early to begin preparing to be interviewed by the media, experts in your field, your peers, or potential employers.

Preparing for interviews

There are two ways to prepare for interviews—whether they’re scheduled a long time in advance, or you’re contacted at the last minute:

1. Prepare the basic facts. Start by preparing answers for the background questions most likely to be asked. These “softball” questions are often formalities, asked to establish your credentials, create rapport with the interviewer, and set the stage for the more important questions to follow. By anticipating these questions, and being comfortable responding to them, you can get through them faster, increasing the time you can spend on the more important questions to follow.

2. Opinions, perspectives, and promoting your book. Next, plan for the types of opinion and perspective questions the interviewer is likely to ask you. Knowing that that “hardball” questions are likely to follow the set of questions helps you prepare responses that can be used as opportunities to promote your book and your personal brand.

Getting the easy questions out of the way

Start by making a list of the questions you would ask if you were interviewing yourself, and preparing answers that reinforce the key characteristics of your personal brand.

Prepare answers that give you an opportunity to reference your book and relate to your personal brand and the key message, or position, you want callers to remember after the interview.

Don’t attempt to “script,” or memorize, your responses to the basic questions about your education, interests, and employment (or self-employment), history.

Instead, prepare a mind map or fact sheet listing the background questions you’re likely to be asked, along with the key ideas and connections you want to make between your background, your book, and your personal brand. Use a large type size so you can glance at it during the interview.

Never “read” your answers! Instead, review your mind map of fact sheet before the interview, and have it handy for a quick glance during the interview.

I find it’s a good idea to avoid using full sentences when organizing my ideas before an interview. Instead, just jot down the main ideas and phrases you want to include in your answers. Sentences take too much space. They also encourage you to read your responses, rather than responding in a confident and enthusiastic tone.

By the way, if you’re worried about not being able to recall important ideas, try copying your list of anticipated questions and responses in longhand. Writing ideas out by hand often improves enhances you ability to recall the key ideas at a later date.

Anticipating unexpected questions

The best way you can be avoid being surprised by unexpected questions during your interview is to constantly monitor the news and trends effecting your corner of the world, i.e., those who are interested in the area where you’re building your brand. This helps you prepare appropriate responses ahead of time.

RadioInterviewAs you prepare for your interview, ask yourself questions like:

• What are the latest changes, challenges, and trends? What’s happening in my field? What are the implications of these changes? What types of businesses and associations are most effected? What are the political, economic, or social changes you recommend your clients and prospects monitor? Which of these challenges and trends are most important, and what do you recommend your clients and prospects do? How are you preparing to make changes in the way you do business?

• What are the positive changes are taking place in your field? What does the latest research indicate? What progress, or research, shows the most promise? How can others in your field apply and leverage their changes to their businesses and lives?

• How are you helping others in your field? As you discuss positive changes, be sure to reference what you’re doing to improve the overall state of affairs. What are the steps you’re taking, and what steps do you wish others were taking, that would benefit everyone concerned? Look for ways to position yourself as an activist leader in your field, on the cutting edge of solutions.

The last question, of course, permits you to reference specific topics in your book as a way you’re serving your market.

How you say versus what you say

It’s not just your message that improves when you anticipate and prepare to be interviewed. The more you prepare, the more comfortable you’ll be during the interview…and your comfort instantly communicate itself to your interviewer as well as those reading, viewing, or listening to your interview.

With anticipation and preparation, your responses to the interview questions you’re asked will not only be on-point and relevant, but your delivery will also communicate your confidence, likability, and enthusiasm for your topic.

With a little anticipation and preparation, you’ll emerge as not only as expert, but as a likeable expert!

The ultimate preparation

I’ve found that the best way to prepare for an interview is to create your own interview questions and submit them ahead of time to the interviewer.

Preparing your own questions is a great confidence helps you rehearse your responses, increasing the likelihood that you’ll be able to insert “hooks” to your book and your personal brand.

There’s a high likelihood that your interviewer will ask some, or all, of the questions you submit in advance. It saves them preparation time and provides a structure for the interview.

It’s never too early to prepare to be interviewed

No matter young or old you are, or where you are in your publishing and personal branding journey, it’s never too early to prepare for your first interview.

Spend a few minutes each day anticipating the questions you’re likely to be asked and want to be asked during upcoming interviews, and jot down the key ideas and points you want to include in your answers. When the time comes to be interviewed, you’ll be able to respond with the words and the attitude that communicates your expertise, sells your book, and enhances your personal brand. How do you prepare to be interviewed? Share your favorite ideas and techniques as comments, below.

BONUS: Get a FREE 25-page report from author and speaking coach Larry James, How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest.

RogerParker

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Copyright © 2011 – Roger C. Parker. Roger C. Parker is a book coach whose www.publishedandprofitable.com site shares what he learned writing 40 nonfiction books, including #Book Title Tweet: 140 Bite-sized Ideas for Compelling Article, Book, and Event Titles. Before you start to write your next book, download a free proof copy of his do-it-yourself workbook, 99 Questions to Ask Before You Write or Self-publish a Brand-building Book.

Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
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Friday, February 4, 2011

Promote Your Book with Radio

Filed under: Guest Author Articles,Radio Talk Show Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am
Tags:

Dana Lynn Smith, Guest Author

Radio appearances are a good way to build your expert status and promote your book. Thousands of broadcast radio and online radio shows interview authors and experts, and you can even start your own show.

To find radio shows in your niche, try online searches such as these:

• Radio talk show + keyword
• Online radio show + keyword

It’s a good idea to start with smaller shows and work your way up as you gain more experience. Online radio can be a great way to hone your interview skills before approaching broadcast stations. Many online radio shows are targeted to a very specific niche, but the audience may be relatively small.

Blog Talk Radio is the largest network of online radio shows. Enter your keywords into the search box on the upper right side of the screen to find shows that are a good fit for you.

talkshowsFor tips on starting your own show on Blog Talk Radio, see their tutorials and read “BlogTalkRadio Offers Books Authors the Opportunity to Host Their Own Shows” by Phyllils Zimbler Miller.

Here are several shows that regularly interview authors:

The Indepedent Author
Today’s Author
Red River Writers Live
Web Talk Radio
Dresser After Dark

Several authors who have been very successful promoting their own books on the radio sell databases of broadcast radio talk shows. Check out these sources:

Gordon’s Radio List includes 1,100 locally produced and nationally syndicated radio shows that interview guests.
Joe Sabah offers a how-to book, an audio program and a database. His book, How to Get on Radio Talk Shows All Across America Without Leaving Home, is also available on Amazon.com.
Alex Carroll offers a radio station database and training materials.

For tips on getting booked on radio shows, see “Five Tips for Writing a Strong Press Release” by Marsha Friedman and “Best Ways to Approach Radio and TV Talk Shows” by Karen Melamed.

For advice on how to be a great radio guest, read Annie Jennings’ “Radio Interview Tips for Authors.”

Don’t forget to list your radio appearances on the Media page of your website. It gives you credibility and shows potential hosts what other shows you have appeared on.

Here are some great resources:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/btr101.aspx

http://bookmarketingmaven.typepad.com/book_marketing_maven/2009/10/book-publicit
y-blogtalkradio-offers-books-authors-the-opportunity-to-host-their-own-showsblog
talkradiocom-an-intern.html

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/theindieauthor

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ewenprime

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/RedRiverWritersLive

http://www.webtalkradio.net/index.php/about-us

http://www.dresserafterdark.com/

http://www.radiopublicity.net/

http://www.joesabah.com/radio.html

http://www.radiopublicity.com/

http://bookmarketingmaven.typepad.com/book_marketing_maven/2009/12/book-publicit
y-five-tips-for-press-release.html

http://bookmarketingmaven.typepad.com/book_marketing_maven/2009/09/best-ways-to-approach-radio-and-tv-talk-shows.html

http://www.emsincorporated.com/ebook/

http://www.anniejenningspr.com/pages/mediatraining.htm

Savvy Guides: http://bookmarketingmaven.typepad.com/savvy_book_marketer/

Dawn’s Twitter: http://twitter.com/bookmarketer

Book Marketing Blog: http://bookmarketingmaven.typepad.com/

BONUS Articles:Radio Station Checklist
How to Be a Great Radio Guest

SPECIAL #1: If you would like to receive a FREE 26-page report of the two bonus articles by Larry James above, click here. (Thank you Dana Lynn Smith for your great work on preparing this report!)

SPECIAL #2: Get “Your Savvy Book Marketing Secrets: 52 Experts Share Insider Tips for Selling More Books” eBook FREE! This ebook focuses on low-cost and no-cost book marketing tactics, like blogging, radio interviews, social marketing, writing articles, publicity, getting endorsements, and speaking, and it also includes advice on ebook and print book publishing. The 60+ articles are arranged by topic to make it easy to find just what you need. Savvy Book Marketing Secrets features articles from top book publishing and marketing experts, including Dan Poynter, Brian Jud, Penny Sansevieri, Sarah Bolme, Roger Parker, Shel Horowitz, Mark Coker, April Hamilton, Carolyn Howard-Johnson, and 43 others. Get your Savvy Book Marketing Secrets ebook today at http://bit.ly/SavvySecrets, and feel free to share that link with other authors and on your social networks.

DanaSmithCopyright © 2011 – Dana Lynn Smith. Reprinted with permission. Dana is a book marketing coach and author of the Savvy Book Marketer Guides. For more book marketing tips, follow BookMarketer on Twitter and get Dana’s free Top Book Marketing Tips ebook when you visit her book marketing BLOG.

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Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Monday, December 6, 2010

Radio Talk Shows

Filed under: Radio Talk Show Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am

It has been my experience that if you have written a book, radio talk shows are the best way to promote it. No other medium lets you promote your product, service, cause or issue in front of thousands of people than radio talk shows. And the best part. . . it doesn’t cost you a cent.

There are more radio listeners in the U.S.A. than TV watchers and Newspaper readers. Did you know that more than 200 Million American commuters listen to the radio on their way back and forth to work every day making radio the most powerful media there is. . . even more powerful than TV?

It’s a little more complcated than just calling a radio station and asking to be interviewed. So. . . welcome to a mini radio talk show school. This information will get you pointed in the right direction.

First, you need to read: “How to Be a Great Radio Guest!”

Next, read: “Radio Station Checklist: Stuff You NEED to Know & Do BEFORE You Go on the Air!”

SPECIAL: If you would like to receive a FREE 26-page report of the two articles above, send an e-mail to Larry James. Be sure to type, “Please send How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest” in the subject and I will sent it to you as a Word docx by e-mail.

Before you dive in the “radio talk show” pool, study the two articles above. There are at least 11 more great articles about being on radio talk shows on my Author & Speaker Website. They will help you get some of the training you need to get started.

NEVER pay the radio station to be interviewed. Producers of talk shows want to talk with you. They are constantly on the lookout for great guests to help them entertain and frankly, to help them build the ratings for their station. They need you just like you need them.

Fifteen minutes on a talk show can bring you more business or website traffic than you can get by paying for an equal amount of traditional radio advertising.

TIP: Don’t pitch radio stations for an interview if you haven’t been media-trained to do radio interviews. You may ruin your chances of ever getting invited back. Don’t pitch radio stations for an interview if your book is not in the book stores. Not much need to create excitement for your listeners if they can’t go out and buy your book. Talk to a coach with prior radio experience and more than 650 radio interviews under his belt!

Media expert, Brian Farris says, “The number of listeners is usually in direct proportion to the market size, but not always. A small 1000 watt AM station in Casper, Wyoming (market #286) is going to have far fewer listeners that a 1000 watt AM station in New York City (market #1.) But, the biggest station in Casper could very well have more listeners than the smallest station in New York City. So it’s not always the market size that counts.”

Brian further states: “There is a good side to doing a lot of small station interviews. One is that you can do lots of practice; but the real reason is that you are building a network of small station interviews (which really becomes your personal contacts) which causes the larger stations to take notice. All radio people talk, via discussion lists, blogs, newsletters, conventions, and owner-supplied white lists. Once you get some of these folks talking about you (about how good you were on the air), other stations will listen.”

With such an abundance of shows airing on terrestrial stations, online stations, (even Podcasts) and satellite radio, and covering such a wide range of topics, you’re sure to find many that will be a good match for your message.

Need to know which radio stations to contact? Radio-Locator – This site claims to be – and in my opinion is – the most comprehensive radio station search engine on the Internet. With links to over 10,000 radio station Web pages and over 2500 audio streams from radio stations in the U.S. and around the world, listings show call signs, distance from selected cities and towns, frequency, format, and signal strength.

If you are new to radio talk shows, until you become experienced at matching wits with the hosts, you might want to begin your media tour by beginning with the #200 radio market and work your way up to #1.

For a list of the “Top 200 Radio Markets,” click here.

By the way, radio talk shows are not just good for promoting your books, they can assist you in promoting a speaking engagement, a book signing, a product you sell and more.

BONUS Article: No Shock – Talk Radio’s a New Game! Part 1

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Copyright © 2010 – Larry James. Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Radio Talk Show Tip

Filed under: Radio Talk Show Tips — Larry James @ 7:00 am

Weave the name of your book into the conversation so it sounds like it is a necessary part of the conversation. Do not say, “As I said in my book. . .” without mentioning the title. This takes some practice to keep from sounding like your only intention is to promote.

talkshowRadio producers and hosts love to interviews guests who know how to be promotional, that is, mention the name of their book without sounding like a commercial. Practice using the name of your book as if it were a person not a thing to promote.

When you say “in my book” you may come off as a pushy author. Instead, use the title of your book and give some helpful tips. You are there to teach, and the more you teach the more the listening audience will want to buy your book. Teach the audience at least several things that will make their life better.

IMPORTANT: Make sure the host gives your Website (or you throw it in as you’re saying goodbye) and send the audience there not to “buy” your book but to get a “freebie” from your Website.

BONUS Articles:Radio Station Checklist
How to Be a Great Radio Guest

SPECIAL: If you would like to receive a FREE 26-page report of the two articles above, send an e-mail to Larry James. Be sure to type, “Please send How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest” in the subject and I will sent it to you as a Word docx by e-mail. (Thank you Dana Lynn Smith for your great work on preparing this report!)

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Copyright © 2010 – Larry James. Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

Monday, October 11, 2010

Speak in Soundbites on Radio Talk Shows!

Why do radio talk shows to promote yourself or service?

1. Most radio interviews can be done by telephone, with no travel required.
2. Most interviews are live, and allow for Q & A from the listeners.
3. With interviews ranging from five to sixty minutes, this forum provides adequate time for a you to talk about yourself, book or service.
4. A guest can give out a toll-free number, website, or direct listeners to a bookstore to make a purchase.

Wikipedia says, “A soundbite is an audiolinguistic and social communications phenomenon. It is characterized by a short phrase or sentence that deftly captures the essence of what the speaker is trying to say. Such key moments in dialogue (or monologue) stand out better in the audience’s memory and thus become the “taste” that best represents the entire “meal” of the larger message or conversation. Soundbites are a natural consequence of people placing ever greater emphasis on summarizing ever-increasing amounts of information in their lives.”

In a radio interview, an answer to a host’s question has 3 parts.

• Restate the question or the problem
• Give an example of the problem
• Define the solution

Don’t fail this test. Be fiercely opinionated. Be who you are! Offer your input and perspective. Be inspiring, provocative, believable, different and memorable. Look at this opportunity as an audition; a genuine tryout for a real on-air performance. Speak to them in your very best soundbites.

When an author is interviewed on radio (or television), unless it’s a live broadcast, you never know what may end up on the cutting room floor after editors are through tightening it.

It is critical to repeat your core message points and your book’s title several times to be sure that even if only one of your answers makes it over the airwaves, the book gets some play. No matter what you are asked, chime in on you message, as everything you say must support your ideas.

Be Prepared – Have your cheat-sheet with your keywords and book(s) in front of you. Be sure to have answers (soundbites) written out for the sample questions you sent the host. Most radio interviews are by telephone. If you go to the studio, take your stuff with you!

Think in terms of limiting an editor’s choices of what will make the final cut.

kerchnersoundbitesSoundbites: A Business Guide to Working With the Media – Kathy Kerchner – With 14 years as a TV new reporter and anchor she’s seen it all; good interviews and “really” bad ones. There is no substitute for hands-on experience and personal coaching. Soundbites coaches you on how to make every interview work “for” you.

barlarLarry’s Review: Learn from the expert! What to say, when and how to say it and WHY you need to learn to speak in sound bites! That’s it in a nutshell. This book was my bible when I appeared on ABC TV’s “The View” with Barbara Walters. I highly recommend it.

NOTE: Larry James has appeared on more than 650 radio talk shows. He’s been a Professional Speaker since 1987 and has written 5 books. If you are invited to do a radio interview and are a little shakey about it, call Larry James. He provides expert coaching for authors and speakers.

BONUS Articles:Radio Station Checklist
How to Be a Great Radio Guest

SPECIAL: If you would like to receive a FREE 26-page report of the two articles above, send an e-mail to Larry James. Be sure to type, “Please send How to Book Radio Shows and Be a Great Guest” in the subject and I will sent it to you as a Word docx by e-mail. (Thank you Dana Lynn Smith for your great work on preparing this report!)

Copyright © 2010 – Larry James. Larry James is a professional speaker and the author of three relationship books, “How to Really Love the One You’re With: Affirmative Guidelines for a Healthy Love Relationship,” “LoveNotes for Lovers: Words That Make Music for Two Hearts Dancing” and “Red Hot LoveNotes for Lovers.” His newest book is “Ten Commitments of Networking.” Larry James also offers “Author & Speaker” coaching. Contact: AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. CelebrateLove@cox.net – More than 110 articles especially for Authors & Speakers at: www.AuthorsandSpeakersNetwork.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and “LoveNotes” listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationships” BLOG at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Networking” BLOG at: http://NetworkingHQ.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Weddings” BLOG at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com

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